Some folks on the right are having fun with this article about … brace yourselves … ecosexuals:

Welcome to the latest turn of the wheel in the obsessive trend-creating machine that brought us “metrosexuals.” Ecosexuals are an evolving breed of city dweller for whom keeping green is every bit as important in their romantic life as in their choice of household cleanser, dinner food, or wall paint. Sure, everyone has a checklist of qualities they want in a mate: smart, funny, good-looking, six-figure potential, listens to Beck, and so on. But now we’re adding characteristics like “sexy conservationist” or “romantic recycler” to the list.

It’s easy to make fun of this kind of self-righteous, finicky elitism, especially reading stuff like this:

For a while she was happily dating a film producer from Los Angeles who, she thought, was definitely on her eco-wavelength. But one morning they went out for breakfast, and Mr. Right ordered an all-meat meal and doused his coffee with several packets of Equal. "I was dumbstruck," says Pearson. "I think I ate my entire meal in silence. Pork plus NutraSweet? That was definitely our last date."

Deep.

Nonetheless, as our own BioD constantly reminds us, there is immense power in the human drive for status. This kind of cultural posturing is certainly no substitute for real action, but however much it makes me want to burp, eat a big steak, and throw an aluminum can at the next snooty San Francisco singleton I see, I’m inclined to think it’s a positive thing on balance.

This kind of thing always starts out among the cultural creatives in the urban enclaves and filters its way down to the masses — it’s how our culture works. Five years ago, Will & Grace was still a big deal. Remember? In five years, I expect not recycling will be no more socially acceptable than racism, and snotty coastal hipsters will be on to setting themselves apart with some other kind of self-conscious virtue. And so it goes, the circle of life.

PS: Is listening to Beck still cool? I’m pretty sure that moment passed by in the mid-90s.