Every February, our country celebrates the contributions of African Americans. After the close of Black History Month, we look to the black leaders who are helping to write the next chapter in the American saga. Below, we highlight eight scientists, political activists, and community organizers working to protect our country from carbon pollution and climate change. In a time of struggle and strife, they have shown passion, persistence, and unflagging optimism.

Nakisa Glover, 34

nakisa-glover
Nakisa Glover

Glover, who holds a biology degree from University of North Carolina at Charlotte, has built a track record as a community organizer. She brings her devotion to advocacy and community service to her role as the National Climate Justice Organizer with the Hip Hop Caucus, where she deals with issues like voter suppression, economic empowerment, environmental justice, and human rights on behalf of underserved communities.

“Climate justice and social justice need each other. What is the point of clean air, clean water, and green grass if the people of the world are dying at the hands of social justice ills? Conversely, what’s the point of solving all the social justice issues if the people are going to die because there is no clean air or clean water? We got to solve both together. Recognizing this has been the most pivotal, transformational achievement for me and my work.”