Skip to content Skip to site navigation

Article

Comments

Greenwashing with coldwater?

Is P&G’s Tide Coldwater just more greenwashing?

Everyone who listens to Umbra knows you should wash your clothes in cold water. Sounds like the folks over at Procter & Gamble might be listening. I give you Tide Coldwater. Here is the marketing spiel from the Tide website: Tide Coldwater provides a deep clean in the care of cold water, making it the coolest way to clean. When used in a cold water wash, Tide Coldwater can: Remove even stubborn stains better than the leading competitive liquid detergent in warm water Save energy and money by lowering your heating bills Help colors stay brighter and whites stay whiter …

Read more: Uncategorized

Comments

Comments

Spruce Almighty

Federal judge says Bush rule change on logging illegal The Bush administration broke the law last year when it changed the rules on logging in the Pacific Northwest, a federal judge ruled this week. The Northwest Forest Plan of 1994 requires the government to survey many proposed timber sales for the presence of rare plants and animals, and manage cuts to protect them. This "look before you log" rule has been crucial to protecting the Northwest's forests from overcutting, environmental advocates say, in part because it has empowered such advocates to appeal proposed timber sales and conduct citizen surveys of …

Read more: Uncategorized

Comments

Dam removal

Author declines to make pun, citing ‘posting rules’

The Milltown Dam at the confluence of the Clark Fork and Blackfoot Rivers near Missoula, Mont., will be removed, returning the rivers to their original flow by 2009, according to an agreement reached this week. The folks over at Environmental Economics recently ran a post connecting such dam removals with cost-benefit analyses, pointing to a Time article, archived but available in PDF here. The case of the Milltown Dam has an interesting additional layer to it, as the dam is also the largest Superfund site in the country. Toxic waste has piled up behind the dam as a result of …

Read more: Uncategorized

Comments

Science and environmentalism

Does respect for the former help the latter?

A while ago I posted about environmentalism and the religious worldview. I'm afraid that post was overbroad and led to a discussion about whether one can be a religious environmentalist (of course one can) and, more tediously, whether religion is "good" or "evil" overall. But I had a more specific question in mind. Let me approach it from another direction. This week Bush came out in favor of teaching "intelligent design" alongside evolution in school science classes. I've been debating whether to post about this. This is an environmental blog. Is it an environmental issue? I think it is, if …

Read more: Uncategorized

Comments

To the states!

Individual legislatures take up eminent domain laws

For all the hubbub about the Supreme Court's ruling in Kelo v. City of New London -- that eminent domain could be applied to cases where "economic development" was the public use in question -- the response of state legislatures has been swift. The decision did not prevent states from making their own laws regarding the scope of eminent domain, and public opposition to the ruling has been widespread and bipartisan. An article in USA Today detailed the states' responses and had this to say: In Washington, U.S. Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, said his office received more calls from constituents …

Read more: Uncategorized

Comments

Peak oil consensus

Reasonable people largely agree about what we should be doing

There's a short-but-great exchange today in the Wall Street Journal on the subject of peak oil. You have to subscribe to read it there, but PeakOil has reprinted it in full. It's a conversation between James Hamilton, an economist at UC San Diego (blog here), and Robert Kaufmann of Boston U's Center for Energy & Environmental Studies (what, no blog?!). Generally speaking, Kaufmann favors government intervention in markets to prepare for peak oil, and Hamilton favors letting the free market sort it out. But neither is dogmatic or shrill, and the exchange is quite enlightening, ending in a surprising degree …

Read more: Uncategorized

Comments

Big papers (finally) taking note of hormone-disrupting chemicals

WSJ, USA Today highlight dangers

The Wall Street Journal astounded many in the green community last week when it launched a series on toxic chemicals with an in-depth page A1 story on endocrine disruptors, which, even in teeny-tiny amounts, muck up the functioning of human bodies, according to an ever-growing body of scientific studies. Now USA Today is getting in on the game with "Are our products our enemy?" Here, reporter Elizabeth Weise's delightfully melodramatic lead: Like the glint of a knife in the dark, a laboratory accident in 1998 helped scientists realize that some chemicals commonly used to make life more convenient can be …

Read more: Uncategorized

Comments

Let’s save our environment

Funniest thing ever? Possibly. (Thanks to reader Brian B.)

Read more: Uncategorized

Comments

We Hear Helsinki Is Beautiful This Time of Year

The desertification of southern Europe may be under way With 2003's deadly European heat wave still lingering in memory, this summer's spiking temperatures, rampant forest fires, and record droughts along the Mediterranean are increasingly being seen not as freaky aberrations, but signs of global warming. Dozens of fires have burned from Greece to Portugal. Some Spanish water reservoirs are 80 percent below capacity, and provincial governments are sparring over alleged water theft and illegal wells. The whole of Portugal is gripped by a major drought. In France, this year's extreme aridity spawned an invasion of rapacious locusts in the southern …

Read more: Uncategorized