Skip to content Skip to site navigation

Article

Comments

It’s cool.

I went to the grand opening of the Ballard branch of the Seattle Public Library this afternoon (the old Ballard branch, a boxy, ugly blight, was replaced by a brand new one two blocks from my townhouse, oh happy day). It was a madhouse, with screaming, apple-juice-stained kids everywhere (I brought three myself), long lines at the desk, Bavarian folk music coming from one room and a chamber trio playing in another ... we had to flee fairly quickly. However! Although that other branch gets all the attention, the Ballard building is just awesome. A full list of its environmental …

Read more: Uncategorized

Comments

The moms are organizing. Go join them!

I would be remiss not to mention that the idea -- mothers organizing on behalf of the environment -- started by this story and continued in this discussion thread has found a home at the Green Life google group. All you moms, head over there and see if you can chip in. And keep us posted!  

Read more: Uncategorized

Comments

Bill McDonough, movies, websites, heroes

As my unseemly gushing has no doubt made clear, I heart Bill McDonough. Someone (I forget who) pointed me a while back to this video, on a very cool site called BigPicture.tv, which is packed to the gills with short videos of nifty activists. I couldn't get it to work the first time -- despite attempts on three different browsers -- but Alex linked to it again today, which prompted me to give it another go and what do you know, magically it worked. So anyway, if you can get it working, it's short but worth watching, about how he …

Read more: Uncategorized

Comments

Stats on the biggest kid on the Asian block.

Our fascination with China around these parts is well-known. However, we're not so fascinated that we want to read long, number-filled reports about it. I mean, it's Friday fer chrissake. So, we let Joel Makower do that work for us. He waded through WorldWatch's just-released "Vital Signs 2," a compendium of info on worldwide environmental trends, and found lots of tasty (and, okay, some terrifying) tidbits on the world's fastest growing big economy. Read his summary and be enlightened. Here's a taste, from WW: China is rapidly increasing its dependency on automobiles, with sales of cars and light commercial vehicles …

Read more: Uncategorized

Comments

Weekend reading

The Senate Energy Committee released some of the titles of their draft energy legislation today. So what are you waiting for? Start reading!

Read more: Uncategorized

Comments

Are greens jumping the gun by bashing GE’s new ecomagination?

Over on TomPaine.com today, Frank O'Donnell of Clean Air Watch takes on GE's "ecomagination." Frank makes some compelling arguments -- similar to comments made on gristmill earlier in the week -- as to why this is just a bunch of greenwashing. As strange as it makes me feel to ask this question, I'll do it. Aren't we jumping the gun here, gang? Shouldn't we want a polluting corporation to have an "Extreme Makeover"? Or are we saying "Mission Impossible" to any attempts to change because of past environmental sins? Call me naive (and you probably will in the comments), but …

Read more: Uncategorized

Comments

Rivers Phoenix

Many small waterways rising from ashes, but U.S. rivers still ailing With press attention focused on major river cleanups -- when it's focused on rivers at all -- some 37,000 small river and stream restoration projects in the U.S. have gone largely unnoticed, despite their environmental importance. The local, state, and federal restorations, costing an estimated $14 billion or more since 1990, range from restoring streams' natural curves on behalf of salmon and groundwater supplies to creating streams out of formerly buried plumbing in urban areas, and have contributed to the overall health of the nation's ecosystems one bit at …

Read more: Uncategorized

Comments

Teach an Old Dog a New Mix

Brit researcher says clean energy has more juice than previously thought It's a familiar argument: Renewable-energy technologies are not "mature," and the power they provide is intermittent, so nuclear power is our only reliable, large-scale alternative to greenhouse-gas spewing oil and coal. But Graham Sinden of Oxford University's Environmental Change Institute begs to differ. With the right mix of technologies, properly distributed, Sinden says, renewables can "be made to match real-time electricity demand patterns" and represent "a serious alternative to conventional power sources." His research focused on a mix of wind, solar, and dCHP -- domestic combined heat and power, …

Read more: Uncategorized

Comments

Learn to identify certain common fallacies

In response to this post, both Jeff and Ana have good points. Jeff's is that a parallel bit of slipperiness often pops up in arguments about nuclear energy. On the one hand, we hear that renewables aren't "mature" and that only nuclear can get us safely through the global warming crisis. On the other, we hear that nuclear can do this (safely) only with a decade and billions of dollars in R&D costs for new technologies. But if we have a decade and billions of dollars, why not funnel them into clean energy? Ana's is about the related bogus argument …

Read more: Uncategorized

Comments

Massive new Washington habitat conservation plan is bad news.

Today is the final day for the public to weigh in on a giant new habitat conservation plan--called the Forests and Fish Plan--that will govern how Washington's timber industry behaves and how well it safeguards habitat for endangered salmon. Here's the punchline: the plan will essentially grant the timber industry 50 years of legal immunity to the federal Endangered Species Act. This is not a smart move. Habitat conservation plans, ostensibly designed to protect endangered species, often authorize destructive activity that harms the very creatures they are supposed to protect. The Forests and Fish Plan will supposedly require timber companies …

Read more: Uncategorized