Bob Comis

Bob Comis grew up in a shopping mall in a suburb of Syracuse, New York, playing video games and eating fast food. In his late twenties, he woke up to the unfortunate reality of the industrial food system, especially factory farms. Three months into being a very unsuccessful vegan, Bob realized that he could move to the country with his horse-loving wife and start raising his own animals for slaughter, making sure that they were raised and killed humanely and ecologically. After six years, Bob is finally on the farm full time, and while it is not always easy, he couldn't be happier.

Sustainable Food

The food movement’s multiple-personality disorder: Let’s move beyond foodies and localists

It’s time for people who care about food to quit navel-gazing.Photo: Jared WongThe food movement has a case of multiple-personality disorder. One of its personalities is the foodie, who approaches the movement as a vehicle to increase sensual-aesthetic pleasure. Another of its personalities is the localizer, who views the movement through the lens of the foodshed radius and food miles. Another is small-is-beautiful — small farms, small artisan processors, small distributors. Two more of its personalities are the food-justice advocate and the broadener, who want the movement to expand to a robust, durable, fair, and deeply embedded system that really challenges …

Locavore

Medium is beautiful: why we need more mid-sized farms

Let’s fill meat counters with ethical, sustainable cuts.Photo: Anthony AlbrightRecently, I have made the argument in a couple of different articles (here and here) that in order to make local-regional meat broadly affordable and accessible, we should make a shift from the direct markets (farmers markets, CSAs, on-farm sales) to the existing indirect, arms length markets of supermarkets (and mom and pop groceries and butcher shops). Coming from me, if you know my politics and you know the history of my writings, this is a shocking claim. Nevertheless, I have been thinking about it very hard over the last few …

Locavore

The omnivore’s other dilemma: expanding access to non-industrial food

Buying sustainable pork shouldn’t involve breaking the piggy bank.A couple of years ago at a farmers market, a woman approached my stall, a little apprehensively. She looked old and beaten down. Her face was weathered and worn. Her hands looked rough and gritty. But, it was clear that she was younger than she looked. Her clothes were poor. Her jeans were worn thin around the knees and had faded spots of dirt here and there on her thighs. Before she even said a word, I imagined a life of hard work and hard times for her. She came over to …

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