Claire Thompson

Claire Thompson used to be Grist's editorial assistant. After disappearing into the wild for a while, she is now attempting to reenter society.

Food

Going for the green: Olympic swimmer Natalie Coughlin could medal in gardening

Despite what you hear about Olympians and their heavy diets, Coughlin eats mostly vegetarian and raises fruits, vegetables, and chickens in her backyard in Lafayette, Calif.

Food

Looking back to see ahead: One woman’s quest to bring back Native American food traditions

For native foods educator Valerie Segrest, the solution to health disparities in tribal communities lies in the hunting and gathering of generations past.

Politics

‘The Queen of Versailles’ almost makes you feel sorry for the 1%. Almost.

The film's magic is its ability to make us realize that we're all human. But let's not forget, when the economy collapsed, some were more culpable than others.

Food

No more trowels, no more roots: What happens to school gardens in summer?

School gardens are sprouting across the country. But what to do with them over summer vacation is still an open question.

Food

Buzzkill: EPA rejects beekeepers’ pesticide petition

In March, beekeepers and environmentalists petitioned the EPA to take the pesticide clothianidin -- a suspect in bee die-offs -- off the market. Last week, EPA said no.

Pollution

Jeremy’s iron will: On-screen villain plays the good guy in anti-waste doc

In a new documentary, "Trashed," Jeremy Irons explores the toxic effects an endless worldwide buildup of waste has on our health and environment.

Cities

Cohousing: The secret to sustainable urban living?

Experiments in cooperative living offer a great model for building sustainable urban communities. But can they work for everyone?

Food

Playing with their food: Kids discover the fun of farming at camp

Farm-based summer camps are growing in popularity as parents seek to reconnect their kids with the origins of their food.

Food

Let them eat kale: In Harlem, a farm share for the people

In order to get more healthy food to residents of Harlem and the Bronx, Corbin Hill Farm tweaks the community-supported agriculture model to work better for low-income people.

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