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Whitman, Bush victimized by Crichton

Huh?

There's a good interview with Christie Whitman over on Environmental Science & Technology. I go back and forth about Whitman, but she definitely puts her best -- and by "best," of course I mean, "most sympathetic to my own views" -- foot forward in this interview. I found this a bit bizarre though. When asked about climate change, she says: In fairness, I think we can do more. I think we can get a cap on carbon that would give utilities time to reach it without so dislocating the industry that it will drive the costs of energy out of …

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Sustainable business poster: don't be the last on your block to get it!

Models and rock bands are overrated.

A while back I drew attention to Gil Friend's "Sustainable Business: A Declaratin of Leadership," a handy (and colorful!) capsule summary of what sustainable biz is all about. Now that much-blogged-about document has its very own website, where you can download a poster-sized version. Put it on the wall of your dorm room! None of the sub-pages work yet, but I'm assuming Gil is all over that.

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Mooney on the skeptical follies

Read Chris Mooney’s two recent columns on climate-change skeptics.

Chris Mooney is on a roll lately. I finally got around to his piece in the latest issue of Mother Jones, and it's an absolute must-read. Lots of people have the vague impression that there's a sort of climate-skeptic cottage industry out there, funded largely by a few large financial interests, particularly ExxonMobil. Well, they're right -- check out this chart. There's nothing wrong, of course, with industries trying to advance their views on economic and policy issues, but this is a coordinated attempt to "do science," or rather, create the illusion of scientific controversy around an issue on which …

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The week in review

Good news and bad

A day late, but never a dollar short: Mike's week in review.

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Environmental confessions

What’s your secret eco-sin?

Environmentalists have a reputation for being self-righteous, holier-than-thou prigs. And yeah, well, they frequently are. So in the spirit of humanizing and soul cleansing and all that, we've asked a few greens, including writers Bill McKibben and Terry Tempest Williams, to confess their environmental sins. And we're asking you to do the same! Leave your deepest, darkest environmental sins in comments. We promise, you'll feel better afterward.

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Yeses and No's

Two great tastes that taste great together

Alan AtKisson pleads with us to give him one little favor: If money put into sustainability is returned 3, or 10, or 50 times over in savings, let's think of it as an investment, not a cost. Because the world is now brimming with proof that very many expenditures to keep our environment cleaner, help prevent climate change, and otherwise save our hides (as well as the hides of other creatures) are also profitable. Very profitable indeed. Here I imagine a "bwah-ha-ha-ha!" But in a good way. He gets taken to task in comments for more or less disregarding the …

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As the world burns

Mother Jones runs a package on global warming

Don't miss the current issue of Mother Jones, with a feature package called "As the World Burns" about, as you might surmise, global warming. Here's a chunk of the Editor's Note (which is worth reading in its entirety): In his article "Some Like It Hot" (page 36), Chris Mooney pinpoints a critical distinction in the battle over global warming. The think tanks, crank scientists, and pseudo-journalists who dispute climate change with the aid of millions of corporate dollars are not just arguing the economics of the problem, as they sometimes pretend. That activity, engaging in a thoughtful discussion of politics …

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"Activist judges"

Conservative like activist judges — the conservative kind

Speaking of the federal judiciary, don't miss Brad Plumer on the real substance of current far-right complaints about "activist judges." Contrary to much "liberal activist judge" mythology, "ninety-four of the 162 active judges now on the U.S. Court of Appeals were chosen by Republican presidents." And Republican appointees have a clear majority on 10 of the 13 circuit courts. ... That said, there's still a certain logic to all these complaints. Most of the Republican judges now on the circuit courts, after all, are merely conservative -- by and large exerting a good deal of judicial restraint. By contrast, as …

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Conservative judges: environmental menace or, um, not?

Jonathan Adler says no.

A while back I mentioned an Atlantic Monthly essay claiming that the real danger of an (even more) conservative federal judiciary is to environmental regulation. Jonathan H. Adler has a paper in the Iowa Law Review arguing that the danger is minimal, and mainly at the margins, and perhaps not such a bad thing. The abstract is reprinted on Commons, if you want a capsule summary. I can't say I read all 95 pages (!), but I believe the relevant stuff comes toward the end. Here's a long exerpt: Most discussions of the environmental impact of the Supreme Court's federalism …

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Corporate responsibility reports

Joel Makower discusses.

Last week I wrote about Nike's new (and laudable) corporate responsibility report. This weekend, Joel Makower mentioned it in the course of a longer discourse about these kinds of reports and what they portend. Good reading. (And okay, I give up. If they are "corporate responsibility reports," why is the acronym "CSR" always used?)

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