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Bright green living

Over at WorldChanging, they are big on the idea of "bright green living," the notion that the future can be both more profitable and more sustainable. (Bright as in smart, get it?) They lamented the lack of a central resource for information about BGL and then said screw lamenting, let's make one.  Thus the Bright Green Living Wiki.  (What's a wiki, you ask? See here.) It's a great collection of articles, definitions, and other such resources for those interested in being hip, smart, and green.  Check it out.

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More windmill tilting from PETA

Do you ever feel a slight twinge of guilt when digging into a plate of baked salmon, envisioning the poor fish frolicking with its family and thinking deep thoughts?  Yeah, me neither.  But PETA hopes to change that.  Their "Fishing Empathy" (seriously) campaign kicked off yesterday. It's built around convincing folks that fish are more intelligent than we thought (based on several recent studies).  "No one would ever put a hook  through a dog's or cat's mouth. Once people start to understand that fish, although they come in different packaging, are just as intelligent, they'll stop eating them," says PETA's …

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Isn’t it oxymoronic

Elizabeth McCarthy investigates and comes away unimpressed with "clean coal."

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Starbucks tokens

Next year, coffee mega-super-behemoth Starbucks will begin stocking its stores with partially recycled coffee cups -- 10 percent recycled, to be precise. Ten percent is no great shakes, of course, but even if this is a largely symbolic gesture, perhaps enviros should consider for once hailing the symbolism rather than immediately bashing the company for not doing more. Just a suggestion.

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It’s all about oil

Yesterday we pointed to a story about China's alliance-making with global bad actors, part of its efforts to quench its growing thirst for oil. In today's Washington Post, Robin Wright follows up, focusing on Iran. Readers of James Fallows' seminal article on Iran in the new Atlantic Monthly know that our options around that country's nuclear ambitions are already few and grim -- an alliance with China is certainly not going to help that situation.

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Hope springs delusional

On Monday we wrote about Oregon voters' rather ... what's the word? ... shortsighted approval of Measure 37, which many folks felt would eviscerate the state's largely successful (if slightly bloated and overly complex) land-use planning rules.  Today, Ore. Gov. Ted Kulongoski said that voters didn't actually mean to eviscerate the program, and that he would pay out Measure 37 claims to landowners rather than abandon the rules.   Good luck with that, Ted. David Hunnicutt, head of the property-rights group that pushed the measure, promptly replied: "Ninety-nine out of a hundred people who've had their rights taken from them …

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Arnold. Dude.

Arnold Schwarzenegger (I can't believe I know how to spell that name from memory now) continues to cause cognitive dissonance in the enviro mind, coming out in support of Bush's plan to gut the Roadless Rule. UPDATE: Wyoming Gov. Dave Freduenthal (D), however, thinks the plan sucks. But then, he doesn't think much of Clinton's original Roadless Rule either.

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Isn’t it ironic

Mark W. Anderson reflects on the irony that global warming may soon melt the arctic enough to allow for additional oil and gas exploration there.

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Whither the environmental movement? III

(Part I is here; part II is here.) I was going to do a policy post next, but an insightful comment from reader Sandy M got me thinking again about framing. The second piece of unsolicited-with-good-reason advice I'd give the environmental movement, with apologies to Apple computer, is: Talk different. It's time for enviros to think in a more careful and calculated way about the way they frame their issues. Progressives are forever wedded to the idea that the unvarnished truth is all we need: Give the people the facts and they'll draw the right conclusions. "That," says UC Berkeley …

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Ted says all is not lost

Veteran environmental writer Ted Williams says that, despite recent setbacks, the green movement has made enormous progress since it was born and there is ample reason for optimism.

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