greg hanscom

Greg Hanscom

Underwater cities

Greg Hanscom is a senior editor at Grist. He tweets about cities, bikes, transportation, policy, and sustainability at @ghanscom.

Burgs & the bees

Habitats for humanity: Why our cities need to be ecosystems, too

Weave nature into our cities, an urban and environmental planning professor says, and "we're likely to be better human beings."

Climate & Energy

Congress backpedals, restores cut-rate flood insurance for risky homes

Two years ago, Congress yanked subsidies for risky coastal flood-insurance policies. Lawmakers recently gave them back.

Climate & Energy

Gold-medal skier Ted Ligety raps with a snowflake to save winter

Another Olympian jumps into the climate fight, this time with a slightly depressed ice crystal.

Business & Technology

Slope & change: The ski industry struggles to get its act together on global warming

Business leaders say they're serious about taking the climate fight to Washington. But judging from the friends they're making there, global warming isn't their most pressing concern.

Climate & Energy

Winter warriors: As Sochi heats up, will athletes turn to climate activism?

In a sign of things to come, the Olympic racecourses are turning to mush. Will the athletes take a stand?

Climate & Energy

Olympians to world: Please get serious about climate action, thanks

More than 100 Olympic athletes have signed a statement calling for a meaningful international climate treaty. Here's hoping world leaders are listening.

Climate & Energy

Games changer: Can the U.S. win golds with no snow?

If we continue to crank up the heat, there will be no skiing at all in Park City, Utah, by the end of the century. In an average year, there will be no snow.

Politics

Dreading water: Should coastal communities bear the cost of future floods?

Coastal residents are irate about rising flood insurance premiums. But the next time the sea crushes the coast, the taxpayers may not be able to pick up the bill.

Climate & Energy

The madding cloud: When forecasting the future, scientists’ blind spot is above them

Clouds -- or a shortage of them -- could send the climate into a tailspin. The trouble is, it's almost impossible to predict what they'll do.

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