Grist staff

The Owl and the Pussycats

Canadian wilderness activists still can’t get over their astonishment or their delight over yesterday’s announcement by International Forest Products (Interfor) that it would halt all logging in spotted owl habitat in British Columbia, Canada. The company is the second-most active logger in the endangered owl’s terrain; not long ago it was considered Public Enemy No. 1 by environmentalists internationally for its logging practices in a pristine valley north of Vancouver. Last year, Interfor agreed to a moratorium on cutting in the most controversial areas of the valley; spokesperson Steve Crombie said the company now wanted to show that “[l]oggers care …

Send in the Marine Reserves

Australia has unveiled plans to create the world’s largest marine reserve in 16 million acres of the Indian Ocean, 2,500 miles off the nation’s southwest coast. The Heard Island and McDonald Islands Marine Reserve will be twice the size of Switzerland and will protect one of the world’s most pristine marine environments from exploitation, including fishing and oil and mineral extraction. The Antarctic waters of the reserve-to-be are home to many important species, including the endangered southern elephant seal, the sub-Antarctic fur seal, and the Patagonian toothfish. Heard Island is home to Big Ben, Australia’s highest mountain and only active …

The Dead Phone

If you’re thinking about chucking your cell phone, think twice: Most of the 128 million mobile phones currently in use in the U.S. will end up incinerated or at the bottom of a landfill, according to a report released by the environmental organization Inform and partly funded by the U.S. EPA. By 2005, 130 million cell phones will be discarded each year, resulting in 65,000 tons of electronic waste annually, whose toxic components accumulate in plants, soil, and water. It’s not just a U.S. problem — 1 billion cell phones are in use worldwide — but some other countries have …

Ready, Willing, and Sable

There’s sad news and a silver lining in the world of endangered species today. On the sad side, the first California condor chick brooded and hatched in the wild in nearly two decades was found dead of unknown causes last Friday in Los Padres National Forest. The death of the chick was a blow to a $35 million effort to save North America’s largest bird; still, the program is hailed as a success by biologists, who note that condor numbers have risen from 15 in the 1980s to a current population of almost 200, 73 of which are surviving in …

Sleep With the Fishes

At least 20,000 chinook salmon and other fish have died in Northern California’s Klamath River in the last two weeks, but federal officials are unwilling to attribute the deaths to the Bush administration’s decision to divert water away from the river this year and into an irrigation project in southern Oregon. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director Steve Williams said fish health began to improve on Saturday, well before emergency releases of water from Oregon’s Upper Klamath Lake reached the California “dead zone.” He and other federal officials say that fact suggests that low water flows weren’t responsible for the …

The Smog Monster

Forty-nine years ago, in November 1953, New York City was stricken with a six-day siege of air pollution so fierce that it killed or contributed to the deaths of 25 to 30 residents a day. That was before scientists really understood what was darkening the skies and choking people on the street. In some respects, experts say, that terrible week resembles another one — the week of Sept. 11, 2001. Despite intensive data-gathering, researchers still haven’t fully grasped the human or environmental impacts of the attacks — but some public-health advocates are optimistic that, like the early smog crises that …

Nepa’ed in the Bud

If you’ve been following environmental news lately (or duly reading the Daily Grist), you’ll have noticed an unusual number of stories involving the National Environmental Policy Act. The act, signed into law by President Nixon in 1970, requires all federal agencies to assess and limit the environmental impact of their activities. But the Bush administration says NEPA has created a sea of red tape, and it is seeking sweeping changes to the act. The White House has asked Congress to suspend environmental reviews and limit court challenges to logging projects in fire-prone areas; issued an executive order requiring expedited environmental …

And other words from readers

  Re: I’d Like My C, Under the Sea Dear Editor: The article implies that storing carbon in air pockets under the sea floor is the definition of carbon sequestration. However, the technique is just one of many ways to sequester carbon. Carbon sequestration refers to any way that carbon is removed from the atmosphere. A common carbon sequestration technique for soils is reduced tillage, which keeps carbon from being lost from the soil and emitted into the atmosphere. In soil, extra carbon is almost always a good thing, leading to increased ecosystem functioning (such as efficient nutrient cycling, better …

Don’t Send Us the Bill

The Canadian government prorogued its parliamentary session this week, effectively killing a proposed Species At Risk bill. The bill would have banned the harassment, harming, or killing of endangered species on federal land, as well as destruction of critical habitat. The move represented the third time the Parliament has tried and failed to pass legislation to protect endangered species. Progressive Conservative leader Joe Clark accused the Liberal government of ending the parliamentary session to hide deep divisions in its own ranks, including over the species bill. Fellow Progressive Conservative Parliament Member John Herron said, “This government has not passed a …

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