Grist staff

Precedent of the United States

A federal judge dismissed an effort by the timber industry and users of off-road vehicles (ORVs) to overturn former President Clinton’s order to designate 328,000 acres of federal land in California’s Sierra Nevada as Giant Sequoia National Monument. The plaintiffs challenged the 1906 Antiquities Act, which gives the president the authority to establish monuments. They argued that the act was unconstitutional, and said Clinton should not have been allowed to ban logging, mining, and ORVs in Giant Sequoia. U.S. District Judge Richard Urbina disagreed and upheld Clinton’s order. Industry groups have filed suit in other courts to challenge national monuments …

It's a Jungle Out There

  Re: Un-Happy Meal Dear Editor: Eric Schlosser deserves a medal for this book, which everyone, especially fast food addicts, should read. I read the book, but must admit that I skipped the chapters on the slaughterhouse industry. I feared that things at the stockyards hadn’t changed very much since Upton Sinclair published The Jungle in 1906. Helen Real Dolores, Colo.   Re: Patricia Ross, city councilmember, Abbotsford, B.C. Dear Editor: Thanks for profiling our struggle here in the Fraser Valley of British Columbia and Whatcom County, Wash. Multinational corporations with big investments in fossil fuels are lobbying power brokers …

Hard of Huron

Michigan natural resources officials voted on Friday to lift a four-year moratorium on oil and gas drilling beneath Lakes Huron and Michigan. Supporters said the lake-bottom deposits would boost energy supplies in the U.S. while bringing the state royalty money that could be used to purchase public land. Critics said the risks of the drilling were too great, even though it would be prohibited in “environmentally sensitive” areas. Michigan Attorney General Jennifer Granholm (D), a candidate for governor next fall, hasn’t ruled out suing the state Department of Natural Resources to block the drilling. Other top state politicians, such as …