John Upton

John Upton is a former Grist news blogger. He tweets, posts articles to Facebook, and blogs about ecology.

Business & Technology

Blistering exposé prompts Johns Hopkins to suspend black-lung screenings

Johns Hopkins University has long been paid by coal companies to screen former miners for black lung disease.

Climate & Energy

Forest Service’s firefighting fund can’t keep up with wildfires

Costs to fight fires in forests are climbing, forcing the Forest Service to drain funds intended for research and reforestation to help it battle blazes.

Climate & Energy

Most Tea Partiers think warming is “just not happening”

When it comes to climate science, there is deep division between the Tea Party fringe and the rest of the Republican Party.

Climate & Energy

More nukes: James Hansen leads call for “safer nuclear” power to save climate

James Hansen and three other prominent climate scientists call for the deployment of safe nuclear energy -- and they want support from enviros.

Climate & Energy

Accidents? What accidents? Shell’s Arctic drillers are ready to roll again

The Obama administration barred Shell from drilling in the Arctic following a series of accidents last year. The company is asking for permission to return next year.

Climate & Energy

Leaked IPCC report: Humans are adapting — but hunger, homelessness, and violence lie ahead

Findings from a leaked copy of the IPCC's next report aren't pretty, but they contain some glimmers of hope.

Politics

Bill would boost renewables to 25 percent by 2025, has no chance in hell of passing

Senators (and cousins!) Mark and Tom Udall have introduced a bill that would set a national renewable electricity standard. It's a good idea, sure to die in a bad Congress.

Climate & Energy

Bangladesh’s biggest power plant will harm world’s biggest mangrove forest

Bangladesh is vulnerable to floods and cyclones, which makes its plans for a new coal-fired power plant next to a mangrove forest all the more troubling.

Climate & Energy

Congress backtracking on law that aimed to reduce flood risks

America has been promoting the construction of homes in floodplains since the 1960s. And it plans to do so for another four years under a new bill.

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