John Upton

John Upton is a former Grist news blogger. He tweets, posts articles to Facebook, and blogs about ecology.

Politics

House votes to take Keystone decision out of Obama’s hands

The GOP-dominated House has passed yet another bill to speed up approval of the Keystone XL pipeline -- but it'll never become law.

Politics

Climate activists to protest at Obama group’s climate events

Organizing for Action, the president's advocacy group, should be doing more on climate change, activists say. Fighting Keystone XL would be a good start.

Climate & Energy

Gulf Coast refineries accidentally belch out a lot of chemical pollution

Inadvertent releases from oil and chemical facilities pose scary health threats to locals, according to a recent investigation. ExxonMobil and BP are big offenders.

Food

Mold responsible for Irish potato famine may be gone for good

Scientists studied really old DNA to figure out what caused the famine in the 1840s. They still don't quite know, but they think the mold is now extinct. Phew.

Politics

Inhofe supports tornado aid, says it’s “totally different” from Hurricane Sandy aid

The Oklahoma senator opposed the Sandy aid bill, but says taxpayer assistance for tornado victims is a wholly worthy expenditure.

Politics

Bill aims to tackle climate-caused health problems

Legislation in Congress tries to get the U.S. ready for an onslaught of climate-related maladies. It won't pass, but it's a nice effort.

Climate & Energy

Manhattan to see more killer heat waves

Climate change is expected to boost the number of deaths in New York City's most densely populated borough, a new study finds.

Business & Technology

More than 100,000 electric vehicles now on the roads in U.S.

Sales of the Nissan Leaf and Tesla Model S helped the industry reach this milestone. Meanwhile, Tesla plans to repay a government loan nine years early.

Business & Technology

Nation’s biggest uranium mine planned in New Mexico

Companies from Japan and Canada want to build the mine on land held sacred by Native Americans, and the U.S. Forest Service may just say OK.