Jonathan Hiskes

Jonathan Hiskes is a writer in Seattle and a former Grist staff reporter. Find him at jonathanhiskes.com and on Twitter.

cherry pickers

Brooklyn’s red bees, Maraschino cherries, and a collision of cultures

A beekeeper in the gentrifying Red Hook neighborhood finds her bees returning from their foraging with strange red markings, hunts for a source, and finds her way to a Maraschino cherry factory.

WORLDCHANGING RIP

Worldchanging’s bright green contribution

The site recognized, before much of the environmental movement did, that cities are hotbeds of innovation, leadership, and people who have internalized a sustainability ethic.

impurity test

Why it’s OK for big polluters to get stimulus research funds

If we're going to ask the private sector to invest in energy solutions, that means doing business -- and occasionally awarding research money -- to companies like BP, Duke, and DuPont.

elevated parking

The most secure bike lock in the world (16-second video)

The drawbacks seem to be (1) it looks a little heavy to carry around and (2) if I were a bike thief, I can't imagine a challenge more fun to take on than stealing a bike suspended 20 feet in the air in broad daylight.

I’m no light rail scientist, but …

‘The science of public transit is not too complicated’

Don't habit, social pressure, perceptions about what's pleasant and safe all affect which mode of transport people choose?

What OPEC doesn't want you to see

The best 9 steps toward oil independence

The Mobility Choice Coalition ranks the most effective ways to reduce transportation-oil dependence in a new report.

Give me sprawl or give me death

The Tea Party's 'livability' paranoia

Stephanie Mencimer reports on the hilarious and frightening Tea Party campaign against sustainable development.

CASH RULES EVERYTHING

What the green building industry requires (in one paragraph)

The technology is available. There are loads of talented designers and architects eager to design buildings and places that make more sense than the ones they were born into. What's lacking is money.

hop, skip, and a click

Find out where your city is most walkable with Walk Score's new heat maps

Walk Score rolled out new heat maps for the 2,500 largest American cities, providing a quick way to get a sense of where cities are most walkable.

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