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Cycling has a reputation for being a white man’s sport, hobby, and mode of transportation. It’s an image rooted in truth -- white people accounted for about 80 percent of the cycling population in the U.S. as of 2009 -- but it’s far from a complete picture. From 2001 to 2009, the rates of cycling among African Americans, Hispanics, and Asians grew far more than among whites.

Ed Ewing is working hard to keep that trend going. He’s the director of diversity and inclusion for the Cascade Bicycle Club and co-founder of the Major Taylor Project, a program that uses cycling to empower underserved youth in the Seattle area. The program is named after Major Taylor, the first African-American to win a cycling world championship race.

Ed Ewing.
Cascade Bicycle Club
Ed Ewing.

I sat down with Ewing at his office to talk about his work, his history in bike racing, racism he’s experienced as an African American cyclist, the importance of diversity, inclusion, and equity in cycling and bike advocacy, and much more. Through the course of our conversation, Ewing dove deep. He discussed the systemic issues of race and discrimination, policies like neighborhood redlining, and poverty that shape the lives of the students he works -- and he explained how cycling is connected to all of it.

As he told me, it’s always about more than just getting kids on bikes.