Mary Anne Hitt

Mary Anne Hitt is director of the Sierra Club's Beyond Coal Campaign, which is working to eliminate coal's contribution to global warming and repower the nation with clean energy.

Overwhelming Support for Climate Action at EPA Listening Sessions

Last week, I rode a bus from Indianapolis to Chicago for one of eleven listening sessions on the carbon pollution standards being proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency. When we arrived in Chicago, I took to the stage to help rally the 500-person crowd (video here), calling on the EPA to put forward strong, just standards for the number one source of the pollution that is wreaking havoc with our climate – power plants. Let me tell you, it was inspiring. The volunteers who rode that bus with me, and the thousands more who rallied at listening sessions around the …

The “Electrifying Movement” that Continues to Fight Coal Exports

There are a handful of decisions that are going to be made in the U.S. this decade that will be pivotal in the fate of our climate. The six proposed coal export terminals in the Pacific Northwest are among them. If these terminals are approved, they will unleash one of the biggest carbon sources on the planet, by creating a new pathway for Western U.S. coal to reach Asian markets, and it will be hard to put the genie back in the bottle. That’s why I traveled to Tacoma, Washington, in late October for a public hearing against the proposed …

Asheville Votes to Move Beyond Coal

Chicago. Los Angeles. Austin. Asheville. Wait, what? That’s right, Asheville, North Carolina, can now join the ranks of cities that have chosen to move beyond coal. On Tuesday night the city council voted UNANIMOUSLY to move the city from coal-fired electricity toward a clean energy future. I was just in Asheville in July with my new friend Ian Somerhalder (of TV’s “Vampire Diaries” fame) to speak at a rally where hundreds of people gathered to urge the city to invest in clean energy. Here’s video from that rally… …and now look at the fantastic results! This move by the city …

Celebrating the 1,000th Sierra Club Solar Home

It’s been more than two years since my husband and I installed solar panels on the roof of our home in Shepherdstown, West Virginia. As the months have passed, I’ve enjoyed watching the ticker continually rise on the amount of solar power our panels have generated. I love knowing that our home is more powered by the sun, and less by dirty coal mined by blowing up the beautiful mountains in Appalachia. And across the U.S, I’m not alone! Rooftop solar power is expanding exponentially, and the Sierra Club just celebrated our 1,000th solar home as part of our Solar …

150 Plants Retired: Another Major Milestone Hit in Moving Beyond Coal

Today, the Sierra Club and a growing coalition of over 100 allies announced the retirement of the nation’s 150th coal plant. This is a huge milestone in the ongoing campaign to move the country beyond coal by 2030. Meet retiring coal plant #150: Brayton Point Power Station in Somerset, Massachusetts. It’s a massive 1,500 megawatt plant that is the largest remaining coal plant in New England, and it’s one of the biggest polluters in the state. We can breathe easier knowing that yet another dirty coal plant will retire its massive air pollution. According to the Clean Air Task Force, …

Tar Heels Continue to Pressure School to Divest

If you’re like me, you’re looking for some positive news as the government shutdown and stalemate continues to affect millions of Americans. Let me help – check out the inspiring students of the University of North Carolina Beyond Coal team. Recently, after two years of pressure, the UNC Board of Trustees’ Finance and Infrastructure Committee agreed to meet with these hard-working students to discuss moving the school’s $2.1 billion endowment out of the coal industry and into clean energy (that’s them at the meeting above). By the time October 25th arrived, the buzz around this meeting had reached a peak …

Wendell Berry and Bill Moyers to Talk Coal, Climate This Week on PBS

Beginning October 4, PBS will air a special conversation between two of the people I admire most in the world – Kentucky farmer and author Wendell Berry, and journalist Bill Moyers. Among many other topics, these two giants of American culture will discuss issues very close to my heart: coal, climate change, and the future of Appalachia and the planet. I can’t wait to tune in to Wendell Berry: Poet & Prophet. I hope you will, too. I’ve been a reader of Wendell Berry since I was a young woman, because he was a beloved author of two of my …

Big Clean Energy News Just Keeps Coming: “Solar is Most Economical Option,” Says Energy CEO

On the heels of last week’s release of carbon pollution safeguards from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which requires future power plants to deal with their climate-disrupting carbon pollution, news is rolling in from across the U.S. about massive new clean energy projects that are meeting America‘s energy demand – and giving dirty fossil fuels a run for their money in the marketplace. This week Xcel Energy announced it will triple the amount of solar power it offers while also adding another 450 megawatts of wind power. Here’s the best part — they’re investing in clean energy because it’s the …

What the New Power Plant Carbon Standard Means for Coal

In the words of our Vice-President, this is a BFD. On Friday, September 20, the Environmental Protection Agency released draft carbon pollution standards for new power plants. If finalized as written, the draft will make it impossible to build a new, conventional, climate-destroying coal plant in the U.S. With climate-related disasters already landing on the doorsteps of millions of Americans, from Western wildfires to Superstorm Sandy, this new protection comes as welcome news. As I wrote earlier this week, despite much whining by the coal industry, the simple fact is that no one is building new coal plants anymore. A …

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