Nathanael Johnson

Nathanael Johnson

Thought for food

Nathanael Johnson (@savortooth on Twitter) is Grist's food writer and the author of All Natural: A Skeptic's Quest to Discover If the Natural Approach to Diet, Childbirth, Healing, and the Environment Really Keeps Us Healthier and Happier.

Food

Candy company to kids: Don’t eat too much sugar!

The latest call for moderating our sugar cravings comes from an unlikely quarter: the producer of M&Ms and Snickers.

Food

Would you like some criticism on your GMO-free Chipotle burrito?

When the healthy-fast-food chain announced it was dropping most GMO ingredients, it probably didn't expect a full-on media backlash.

Climate & Energy

California moving to stage 2 of drought grief: Anger

Let all the denial and anger, bargaining and depression hang out! Then Californians can start taking the specific measures that will actually save water.

Food

Farmers are watering your food with fracking chemicals

Chevron is selling fracking wastewater to Central Valley farmers to grow food. Dangers seem limited right now -- but let's be more careful and transparent.

Food

California has a real water market — but it’s not exactly liquid

Farmers are buying and selling water up and down the Golden State, and that helps cut waste. If we streamlined and modernized the system, it could do even more.

big clucking deal

Tyson says: No more antibiotics for our chickens

The largest American chicken producer says it will stop using human antibiotics by 2017. Today the U.S., tomorrow the world?

Food

This is why you’re seeing Mason jars everywhere

If only down-home images could make food healthier and more sustainable, all our food system's problems would vanish.

Food

California’s drought isn’t doomsday, but yes, it will change the state

The most nightmarish scenarios of California's dry future are unlikely to happen. Still, the state must use the crisis as a wakeup call to use water more smartly.

Climate & Energy

New rules cutting farm emissions are kind of a big deal

The Department of Agriculture's new voluntary plan to cut U.S. carbon emissions shouldn't cause a ruckus -- and that just might make it work.