Sarah Laskow

Sarah Laskow is a reporter based in New York City who covers environment, energy, and sustainability issues, among other things.

After not seeing one for 33 years, Japanese government finally declares river otters extinct

When you truly love somebody that’s gone missing, you never admit that she’s gone, even if you’ve seen neither hide nor hair of her for 33 years. So now we know how the Japanese government …

Cities

Here is what London’s elevated bike network could look like

An architect wants to expand the city's bike infrastructure not on the streets but in the air -- like a cross between the High Line and the credits of Futurama.

Climate & Energy

Hurricane Isaac left the Gulf Coast ankle-deep in dead swamp rats

Nutria, a rodent brought to the U.S. over a century ago, are still all over the Gulf Coast today -- but there are now 5,000 fewer of them after Hurricane Isaac.

Cities

A farm in Brooklyn is growing cyborg tomatoes

These veggies can't be programmed to go back in time and kill rebel leaders before they are born (yet). But they can tell their human overlords just how fast and well they're growing.

Mean Tasmanian devils get cancer; nice ones don’t

In the epic songs that Tasmanian devils sing in the future (assuming that Tasmanian devils can sing, and that there are any left to sing epic songs), this period will likely be known as one …

This dog saves whales by sniffing their poo

Back in elementary school, it kind of always felt like grown-ups were outsourcing the job of protecting the world’s cetaceans to us kids. You’ve got money AND cars; why don’t YOU save the whales, guys? …

Living

One more way your plane flights are killing everybody

Remember when cars used to give off disgusting clouds of lead-laden smoke? Planes still do that. Some of them do, at least — in particular, those nasty little planes that rich people fly because car …

Hurricane Katrina caused a baby dolphin boom

Hurricane Katrina was irredeemably terrible for everyone involved — except, it turns out, baby dolphins. (And presumably adult dolphins, who got to enjoy making baby dolphins.) In the years after the hurricane hit the Gulf …

One-fifth of creepy spineless animals could disappear forever

Most species are spineless piles of goo. That’s not a value judgment: About 80 percent of the world’s species are invertebrates, which actually do lack spines. Metaphorically, though, it is we who are the spineless …

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