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3D printing adds ‘skull making’ to its seemingly endless list of uses

Thanks for my new 3D printed skull
oxfordpm.com
Thanks for my new 3D printed skull!

On the one hand 3D printers are awesome, the way you can increasingly employ them to make increasingly just about everything, sometimes out of crap you didn't want anyway. On the other hand, one wonders: When will it all end? Will we soon just be able to create everything in a fucking 3D printer and screw all other forms of manufacturing and the people engaged in it? Are we going to 3D print our food? Maybe our houses? Are we going to 3D print ourselves NEW BODY PARTS? Ha ha ha uh actually this guy just had 75 percent of his skull replaced with a 3D-printed skull.

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Man arrested for flying with 200 pounds of caterpillars

These are not the same caterpillars, but that does not matter, does it? No.
Francis Hannaway
These are not the same caterpillars, but that does not matter, does it? No.

I know that people eat weird things. They eat dogs, cats, and bugs, and perhaps that is no different from eating lambs, pigs, and cows. I went to college. I know about diversity. That said, when I found out that a man was recently detained entering London's Gatwick Airport from Burkina Faso with more than 200 pounds of dried caterpillars, my response was a very simple and un-collegiate "Ewwwwww."

Read more: Food

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Pet-loving architects in the Dominican Republic build a beautiful animal shelter out of recycled materials

ghetto2garden

A very cool-seeming group of individuals in the Dominican Republic, collectively known as Colectivo Revark, have created a colorful, sustainable shelter for 50 unfortunate animals, who have previously suffered from either abuse or neglect. And they've built it from salvaged plywood, tires, shipping pallets, and plastic drums. 

Read more: Living

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Turns out IKEA cake now comes with extra feces

Can you make sure my new kitchen doesn't have any poop in it?
ikea.com
Can you make sure my new kitchen doesn't have any poop in it?

IKEA is so easy to make fun of, what with the weird Swedish names of everything and the cartoon instructions and those anemic little "tools." It's a good thing for them they just make piles and piles of money selling crap to us and don't have any real reason to give much of a rat's ass what we think. Because, right on the heels of the "horse meat in IKEA meatballs" story, we've now found that in December (December??? Did they send the news via Pony Express, and did the first pony die and end up in a Swedish meatball?), Chinese officials destroyed 1,800 pounds of IKEA almond cakes, when tests demonstrated the product had "excessive levels" of coliform bacteria. What is coliform bacteria, you ask? What a wonderful question! It is something often found in the feces of a mammal. In this case, probably a mouse. Better than a human, not better than a cake with no shit in it.

Read more: Food

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Global warming is causing flying squirrels to engage in miscegenation

Dude let's get some of that northern flying squirrel tail tonight that shit is sweeeeeeet
Ken Thomas
Dude, let's get some of that northern flying squirrel tail tonight that shit is sweeeeeeet.

Flying squirrel race purists have another reason to hate climate change: Some scientists believe that as a response to shifting temperatures, the southern flying squirrel has begun to mate with the northern flying squirrel and -- just in case anyone reading this is really, really dumb -- vice versa.

Let's be clear. There is no question that the southern flying squirrel and northern flying squirrel have begun to do it and produce offspring. In a northern region of  Ontario currently being studied with regard to this strange squirrel interbreeding, about 4 percent of the squirrels now being born are hybrids. The question is why. There are many factors that can cause interbreeding, such as loss of habitat, or the sudden presence of invasive species. But Canadian scientists Jeff Bowman and Paul Wilson, who have been studying and tracking this interbreeding, are pretty sure this interbreed lovefest is climate-change related, mostly because the hybrids started to emerge around the same time -- 1995 -- that the winters began to get steadily warmer.

Read more: Climate & Energy

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This soccer ball generates energy while you play

It is a light it is also a ball it is a ball it is also a light
Uncharted Play
It's a ball! It's a battery! It's a ball and a battery!

This is a real soccer ball. You can head it, kick it, knee it, slap it out of a goal with your fist, or, if you are Diego Maradona, knock it into one. A soccer ball does not need another reason to be a wonderful thing, but this particular soccer ball provides one: Kick it around for 30 minutes and it powers an LED bulb for three hours.

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Fly to Mars in a spaceship made of poop

toilet_ship
Rich dude/dreamer Dennis Tito wants to send a man and a woman on a round-trip journey to Mars in 2018. One of the challenges of such a journey: cosmic radiation. A solution for this challenge: lining the walls of the spacecraft with water, food, and -- we really hope this stuff isn't all going to be touching each other -- the astronauts' own feces.

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Don’t try to get anything done in D.C., even driving

dc_traffic
Peter Dutton

We already know Washington, D.C.,  has the worst gridlock in the world. But now we know it has the worst traffic too. HEYOOOOO

The Texas A&M Transportation Institute has just put out its annual Urban Mobility Report [PDF], and D.C. can proudly proclaim that it remains No. 1, based on data collected in 2011. If you are living and driving in D.C., you can expect to lose 67 hours a year and 32 gallons of gas to traffic gridlock. And you can expect to spend roughly $1,400 a year on the problem.

Read more: Cities

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That’s not just a bug, that’s an amazing artist who happens to be a bug

This was painted by a bug
Steven Kutcher and hissing cockroach
This was painted by a bug.

Steven Kutcher is not the kind of entomologist who wantonly sticks bugs on pins in display cases. He is the kind of entomologist who lovingly applies non-toxic paint to a bug's feet, lets the bug walk around on a damp piece of paper or canvas to create a tiny masterpiece, and then carefully cleans the bug off when done.

bug_art
Steven Kutcher and darkling beetle
Read more: Living