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Why do you laugh when people fall down? Blame your ape ancestors

Are they going to think it's as funny as we did that we ate all of these? (Photo courtesy of the National Archives of the Netherlands.)

So, assuming you don't believe that we came from Adam and Eve and that we were in some way descended from non-human primates, it should not come as a huge shock to you that we have some of the same laughing habits as apes. No, it's not that apes can't wait for Anchorman 2 to come out either or are also sad that Phyllis Diller died. But a recent study published in Evolution and Human Behavior indicates that they do laugh at practical joke-type stuff, such as someone slipping on a banana peel (which is much more common among apes anyway). And the way that we laugh -- making sort of weird animalistic honking sounds -- is how apes laugh too.

The study didn't figure out every damn thing about people, laughter, and apes -- gotta leave something for the next study, so you can get more of those sweet, sweet tax dollars. But it suggests that laughter predates language, and, ergo, humans. In fact, laughter plays a social role that may have helped early human communities emerge.

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100-year-old chestnut tree composes its own concert and light show

Can you play "Free Bird"? (Photo courtesy of Softpedia.)

There's a 100-year-old chestnut tree in Berlin's Monbjoupark, and recently, it did something other than just stand there looking good -- it actually held its own concert.

Chestnuts tend to fall from this tree, being as how it's a chestnut tree and all. And when they fell on the sound and light installation underneath, they made music.

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$4,000 eco-chandeliers are made of bike parts and self-importance

So a Los Angeles artist fashions these massive chandeliers out of old bike parts that she gets out of the junkyard. All right. That’s fine. That’s good, even. Less crap in junkyards -- we're all for it. And she sells this stuff on Etsy, because if you’re a woman who ties a kerchief around her neck and enjoys the fetching-patches-of-dirt-and/or-grease-on-buff-arms look, Etsy will eventually become a part of your life. So, Etsy made a pretty slick video of this woman talking about her chandeliers -- the endeavor as a whole is called “The Connect Project” -- and, well, it is three minutes of comic gold:

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We dare you not to cry while watching this man hand-feed a sick bee

You know when you see an AT&T commercial, or Terms of Endearment, or the final episode of Friends, and you cry, and you feel really stupid? Well, you don't have to feel stupid crying at this video of a grown man nursing a bee back to health. Instead, you can cry and feel green. You can call up Al Gore and be all, "Hey, Al, this video? Of a grown man nursing a bee back to health? Feeding it honey by hand? And making a video of it? Is making me cry?" And you know what Al Gore will say to you? He will say, "Bro, I have used up a whole frickin' box of Kleenex on this thing -- no shame!" Anyway. Have you ever heard of anything so cute in your life? No, you have not.

The grown man in question, whom we're going to call Mark because his YouTube handle is MadMark99 and we're guessing his name is not Mad or 99, found the bumblebee lying on its back in the road. He decided to revive it by feeding it honey out of the palm of his hand.

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This design turns New York’s parking lots into awesome prefab apartment buildings

Why don't you go over and ask that 2004 BMW 325i Sport for a cup of sugar? (Photo by Zeroth, Phillips, Schulman, and Lubomir.)

Trendwatchers say the people of New York are heading away from their dependency on cars. We're not entirely sure about that -- the last time we were there we almost got run over like seven times, and those cars weren't driving themselves. But that's what they say, and if this is in fact true, there will be less need for the approximately 100,000 off-street parking spaces in Manhattan -- which could instead be used to house the huddled masses flocking in from rural areas to urban in pursuit of the meager remaining available resources. And that's why designers Lawrence Zeroth, Jack Phillips, Brian Schulman, and Eugene Lubomir made a plan to start turning car lifts into housing pods.

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360,000 bees are staying at the Waldorf Astoria

With bees at the Waldorf Astoria, this yellowjacket had to settle for the Comfort Inn. (Photos by Kaj Siebert and Shutterstock.)

You shouldn't be too terribly surprised that New York's fancy-ass Waldorf Astoria has a farm-to-table component in its dining, but what you might find surprising is that there are 360,000 bees currently residing at the top of this landmark hotel. This year so far they have made about 125 pounds of “Top of the Waldorf” Rooftop Honey.

Founder of Bees Without Borders Andrew Coté is running the project, and once it is fully operational, they hope to produce 600 pounds a year. A roof garden is also in the works, in the hopes that potential visitors will see the Waldorf as some sort of adorable little country farm instead of part of an enormous corporation called the Blackstone Group which specializes in mergers and acquisitions and leveraged buyouts.

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Meat map shows you how to avoid antibiotics

We don't want you to eat meat with antibiotics in it, you shouldn't want to eat meat with antibiotics in it, and Robert Kenner, the director of the occasionally disturbing movie about the commercial food industry, Food, Inc., really does not want you to eat meat with antibiotics in it. Which is why he created this delightful crowd-sourced map that lets you enter your  zip code to locate stores, farms, restaurants, and markets where you can get meat that won't contribute to antibiotic-resistant superbugs that will kill us all.

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Now you can download and print an entire house

I hope that by "do-it-yourself" you don't mean I should do it MYself, but it's a great idea. (Photo courtesy of WikiHouse.)

A London-based design team has come up with DIY designs for "WikiHouses," which let would-be home constructors download plans and "print" the components themselves rather than buying them in a factory. In practice, I am pretty sure I couldn't build a house even if all the parts were made for me. But in theory, this looks really cool!

The WikiHouse software, which is free, produces the CNC (computer numerical control) code to print all of the home’s components out of wood. Users can take the codes to a CNC workshop if they don't have an appropriate machine (which they probably don't), and can also adapt and improve the open-source software. Some of the designs even fit together like a jigsaw puzzle, and don't need to be nailed or screwed together.

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Here’s a nice story about a cute baby endangered sea turtle getting rescued

I am cuter than E.T. -- you know that, I know that, Spielberg knows that. (Photo by alejomsc.)

A lot of turtles died during the BP oil spill -- the death rate was four to six times the norm during the months following the spill. But this rare white sea turtle is alive, and that is good.

He was found recently in Smyrna Beach, Fla., with another baby white sea turtle. His sibling swam away, but this little nugget of adorableness was not strong enough, so marine biologists nursed him until he was strong enough and now they are releasing him. Kind of like E.T., but with less product placement.

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Charbroiled burgers create more air pollution than diesel trucks

Represented on this page is the equivalent of the pollution emitted from a truck in about 2,000 miles of travel. Yum. (Photo by Tamorlan.)

Researchers at University of California, Riverside have discovered that greasy, smoky commercial charbroilers found in burger restaurants create a lot of air pollution. More, in fact, than diesel trucks. From a pollution perspective, you're better off having fresh food shipped in from 143 miles away than grabbing a burger at the burger shack down the block.

It's appropriate if sad that this study was done in Riverside, Calif., a place so nasty with smog that even if there were an actual flowing river there, instead of the remains of the remains of one, you'd never be able to see it. If anyone knows anything about fine particulates, it's folks out here. And they say burgers are the real terrorists.

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