Skip to content Skip to site navigation

Sarah Miller's Posts

Comments

We are weirdly addicted to this neighborhood-identification game

If you like maps this game is fun
Click That 'Hood
If you like maps, this game is fun.

Remember when you were in fifth grade and Miss Pierce gave you an empty map of the U.S and you had to fill it in? And Florida was pretty easy and maybe California and Michigan and then you got to the Midwest and were like whhhat? Well, the Louisville-based nonprofit Code for America (not exactly clear on what they do but they want to "make a difference" so they must be reasonably OK) has created a really awesome game called Click That 'Hood where you kind of do that. Even better, it lets you be smug about how well you know your city!

Read more: Cities

Comments

Scientists may have found an all-natural way to keep bread from going moldy

sad_moldy_bread

We waste an estimated 43 billion pounds of food a year. That's about 10 percent of the food sold in stores. A big subset of the category of perishable foods is bread -- but scientists think they may have come up with a way to extend this popular food item's longevity, by using fatty acids found naturally in sourdough bread.

Read more: Food

Comments

Baby sea lion found lounging in luxury at San Diego hotel

sea_lion_chair
Sea World

A room at San Diego hotel the Pantai Inn will definitely set you back a few bucks. But this baby sea lion didn't let her lack of funds keep her away from a stay in the lap of luxury -- she took matters into her own flippers and made herself comfortable on one of the hotel's deck chairs. Seems like this pup definitely knows how to have a good time, and how to yell like the dickens when The Man decides the party's over.

Read more: Living

Comments

What’s inside this squid? Oh my god, it’s a bomb!

See something, say something.
USAF / Nate Dorr
See something, say something.

A fishmonger in China was cutting up a fish when his knife struck something metal. No, it wasn't a fish pacemaker or a fish peace medallion. It was a bomb. The squid, which was only about three feet long, had swallowed a three-pound bomb.

The bomb is thought to be rather old and they can't tell where it's from, but it is still fully operational. Officials say the squid ate it thinking it was food, which is reassuring because it would be terrible to think the squid ate it thinking it was a bomb. That said, squid generally eat stuff like shrimp. And I've seen some big shrimp in my day, but not that big. And there's never a bomb-size shrimp special at Red Lobster, although it is in keeping with its brand.

Read more: Food, Living

Comments

Baby giraffe is impossibly adorable, good news for an endangered subspecies

Cute giraffe time people. Stop what you're doing now.
Cute giraffe time, people. Stop what you're doing now.

A rare giraffe -- named a Rothschild giraffe after British zoologist Lord Walter Rothschild-- was recently born at a Connecticut zoo. This is exciting because a) Connecticut is generally uninteresting, and b) it is always exciting when endangered animals repopulate themselves, even if only slightly. The giraffe's mom is named Petal, and the baby giraffe, as yet unnamed, is already six feet tall.

Apparently, this child-of-Petal is very curious. She likes to hang out with people. BRB moving to Connecticut to sneak into the zoo and cuddle the giraffe.

Here's a video of her standing up for the first time:

Read more: Living

Comments

Man presumptuously kidnaps 13 percent of an entire turtle species

Tell me you wouldn't steal 13 percent of the living population of these guys.
Hans Hillewaert
Tell me you wouldn't steal 13 percent of the living population of these guys.

There are only 400 -- that's 400, a number you can count to in less than five minutes -- turtles in the whole entire world that can call themselves Astrochelys yniphora, or ploughshare turtles (if turtles could speak, or could in fact do anything other than eat lettuce with stupid expressions on their faces). So naturally, since humans are perhaps even dumber than how dumb turtles look eating, a man took it upon himself to try to smuggle 54 of these turtles through the Bangkok airport. That's 13 percent of the ploughshare turtles in the world.

Read more: Living

Comments

Soon, you’ll be able to use New York’s pay phones to call the year 1993

1993 called, it wants you to call it back on this pay phone.
1993 called, it wants you to call it back on this pay phone.

The New Museum has launched an exhibit on 1993. This is depressing for those of us who were fully adults then, but should be fun for people filled with innocent and childish wonder what that time was all about. In order to promote the exhibit, the ad agency Droga5 has come up with a pretty cool idea: You can call the number 1-855-FOR-1993 from any of the 5,000 sad, forlorn, nearly useless phones in the city, and you can talk to the past.

Read more: Cities

Comments

Oklahoma man will pay you $100,000 to take his geodesic dome

For just $100,000, this can be yours.
For just $100,000, this can be yours.

Have you always wanted to live in a geodesic dome, Buckminster Fuller's famous efficient shelter structure? You haven't? Well, there's some good evidence that you're right, because an Oklahoma man is offering a sum of $100,ooo to anyone willing to take his off his hands. Which can only mean that owning the thing is a pain in the ass somewhere beyond the realm of human comprehension.

Read more: Uncategorized

Comments

Is there any point to buying organic baby food?

800px-Baby_eating_baby_food
Ravedave

Organic baby food makes up about 10 percent of the $1.4 billion spent on baby food and snacks, maybe less because so many people buy it and more because it costs like twice as much as regular baby food. A recent study raises the question: Is this money you really need to spend?

A 2012 study in the Annals of Internal Medicine looked at whether organic foods were safer or healthier than conventional foods. The study, which included pregnant women and children, found no evidence that organic food was superior to conventional food, in terms of nutrition. But it did find a 30 percent lower risk of pesticide contamination in organic food. Which ... sounds like a desirable quality in a baby food, from where we're sitting.

Read more: Food

Comments

New Weather Channel show talks to the people who are trying to change the climate (with cartoons and jokes!)

alt-Hurricane_InfoGraphicV4

We already know that the Weather Channel CEO actually believes in climate change, and now he's putting his programming where his mouth is, with a new series that will take a look at the ways that scientists and others are tackling the planet's little weather problem. Each week, the show's host visits researchers who are coming up with creative, and in some cases cray-cray, solutions to rescue us hapless citizens from the havoc we're wreaking on our world.

Read more: Climate & Energy