Skip to content Skip to site navigation

Biking

Comments

I am kind of in love with these glowing fish bikes

Click to embiggen. (Photo by Andy Wana.)

As I always say, a woman needs a man like I need a fish-bicycle. Which is why I got married, I guess, because I need this fish-bicycle pretty bad.

Read more: Biking

Comments

This amazing lightweight bike is made entirely out of cardboard


Israeli Izhar Gafni is a bicycle hobbyist, and he has made a bicycle entirely out of cardboard. It costs about $10 per bike to make.

"Basically, the idea is like Japanese origami," Gafni says. Folding the cardboard on itself both shapes it and increases its strength, to the point where it can easily support up to 300 pounds of adult human. Here's a video that shows his process -- cutting out forms from cardboard an inch thick, rolling cardboard into tubes, coating it with resin so it won’t melt in the rain, and slapping on a coat of paint:

Then you just strap on your cardboard bike helmet and go!

Read more: Biking

Comments

New York City is making cyclists go to remedial biker’s ed classes

New York City is treating wayward cyclists the same way a driver who's racked up one too many DUIs might be: It's sending them to class to review the basic rules of the road. The New York Times reports:

This spring, the Midtown Community Court began sentencing cyclists who had been issued tickets for certain offenses in and around Midtown Manhattan to a class to learn about bicycles and traffic.

Think remedial driver’s education -- for bike riders.

In theory, it's a reasonable idea: Bikers aren't required to get a license the way that drivers are, and if they've been behaving irresponsibly, well, maybe they don't know the laws. But a judge also admitted to the Times that it might be the laws' fault, too: "There are a lot of laws and not always clarity about abiding the law," she said.

Read more: Biking, Cities

Comments

Watch the winner of the first cross-country bike race cross the finish line — in 1982

In August of 1982, four men rode out of Los Angeles on the Great American Bicycle Race, the first transcontinental bike race ever -- what ABC's Wide World of Sports called "the latest bizarre product of this country's rapidly burgeoning ultra-endurance cult."

The route began at the Santa Monica Pier, where a small crowd of "devoted bike freaks" saw the riders off, ABC said. It began like this:

The route was 2,978 miles and ended at the Empire State Building in New York City. Nine days, 20 hours and two minutes later, Lon Haldeman reached the finish line:

Read more: Biking

Comments

In Copenhagen, you can check bikes out from the bicycle library

We love a good bike share, but you have to admit that the bikes all look the same. Meanwhile, people's bicycle preferences and needs are as varied as ... well, as their taste in books. Which is why Copenhagen, always first with the bike innovations, lets you borrow bikes from the bicycle library.

Read more: Biking

Comments

Bike helmets looked ridiculous in 1948

U.S. Olympic cyclists, 1948. (Photo courtesy of United States Olympic Committee.)

Hey, did you know that bike helmets in the 1940s looked kind of like a cross between a Devo outfit and a bouncy castle? Because I didn't, so I was pretty surprised by this photo of Olympic cyclists at the 1948 games, unearthed by The New York Times

Read more: Biking

Comments

Babes in bikeland: Advice for cycling with kids

My daughter will turn 3 this year, and we just enrolled her in preschool. With all our childcare at home to date, we’ve been lucky to avoid lots of extra running around with the kid. So, no sooner had we signed little Audrey up for preschool than we began to fret about the logistics of getting her to and fro -- without royally complicating our lives.

It’s a bit too far to walk, and since I try to commute as often as possible by bike, it seemed counterproductive to go the few miles by car. What would I do with the car? Drive back home and then hop on my bike? I don’t think so! Drive to work and pay to park downtown? No way!

So, I started to investigate my options for conveying my babe by bike -- it appears to be the most convenient and sensible solution.

I asked other parents what works for them and for tips about equipment, safety, and getting started. I also asked for photos -- and they flooded in, along with all kinds of inspiring insights about the joys of cycling with your kids!

Read more: Biking

Comments

New York’s massive new bike-sharing program tripped up by computer problems

Yet again, our favorite New York City bike rider.

The City of New York was very excited about the partnership it made with Citi for the launch of Citi Bike -- a program that will eventually put 10,000 bikes on the streets of New York (well, mostly Manhattan). And New Yorkers seem excited about it too, though they will undoubtedly soon be cranky.

But the launch date for Citi Bike has been pushed back for at least a month, thanks to the bicycle's longest-standing enemy: more modern technology.

From the Times:

On Thursday ... Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg offered a culprit: computer problems.

“Its software isn’t working yet,” he told reporters at a groundbreaking ceremony in West Harlem. “And just rest assured we’re not going to put out any program here that doesn’t work.”

Bah! Computers! Is there nothing you won't ruin?

Read more: Biking, Cities

Comments

You can help make this bike-in movie theater a reality

Coworkers Jason Anello and Anna Boyarsky set up a bike-in movie theater in Brooklyn last year, and now they want to do it again -- but bigger, better, and bicoastal. They're raising funds on Kickstarter for permits and licensing, because the show itself won't make any money: The plan is for tickets to be completely free, so that everyone in the community can enjoy.

Read more: Biking, Cities

Comments

video

Bike mod lets you ride on train tracks, probably get hit by train

If you live in a city with a thriving streetcar system, chances are you live in Europe and your burg is pretty bike-friendly anyway. But you have to admit that sticking to the streetcar tracks would make it much less likely for you to be hit by a car, while simultaneously making it much more likely for you to be hit by a streetcar. If that sounds like fun, or if you've just always wanted to "ride the rails" but don't actually understand what those words mean, you can take inspiration from this project by German urban collective We Are Visual.

Read more: Biking