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friends with benefits

ExxonMobil could reap as much as $1 trillion under Trump, report says.

The Center for American Progress, a liberal think tank, released a report Tuesday morning that adds up the many ways in which the incoming Trump administration could enrich the world’s largest oil company.

The report comes a day before Rex Tillerson, Exxon’s former CEO, starts his nomination hearing to be President-elect Trump’s secretary of state.

In that role, Tillerson could do a lot for his former employer. The oil giant has massive holdings in foreign oil reserves and remains one of the biggest investors in the Canadian tar sands, with rights worth around $277 billion at current prices.

As it happens, the State Department is responsible for approving the fossil fuel infrastructure that could bring Canadian tar sands oil to the U.Smarket. Remember the Keystone XL pipeline? It could come back from the dead and get approved by Tillerson.

Tillerson could also undo sanctions on Russia that have blocked Exxon’s projects there, including a deal with Rosneft, the Russian state oil company, worth roughly $500 billion.

And then there are the Trump administration’s domestic plans to lift every restriction on extracting oil from public lands and offshore. The CAP report also figures that Trump’s Department of Justice is unlikely to investigate Exxon’s effort to mislead the public about climate change. Tally all the benefits and you get nearly $1 trillion.

So who was the biggest winner of the November election? According to the CAP report, ExxonMobil.


amazing

Keystone XL is approved. Apply now for 35 permanent pipeline jobs.

As expected, President Donald Trump signed a permit for the pipeline’s construction on Friday, though a few roadblocks remain in its path.

The State Department estimates the Keystone XL would provide 42,000 direct and indirect jobs — a number that might be inflated — and only 3,900 of those would be full-time construction positions. The thing is, they’re nearly all temporary, lasting long enough to get Keystone XL built. Once operational, the pipeline would employ just 35 people, according to the estimate.

Those numbers fall a bit short of what a certain reality TV star predicted in 2013:

Keystone XL would carry dirty tar sands oil from Canada to the United States, running over the Ogallala Aquifer and close to more than a dozen tribal lands. That puts a lot of drinking water at risk. As pipelines age, they typically aren’t properly maintained (after all, only 35 permanent employees are doing the work). Sooner or later, they’re sure to leak.

“It’s going to be an incredible pipeline,” Trump said on Friday morning. “Greatest technology known to man or woman. And frankly, we’re very proud of it.”


Spoiler Alert

A fun fact you didn’t know: Koalas don’t drink water, but now they have to.

Just like you tell yourself that you get all the hydration your body needs from beer (you don’t), koalas usually get all the water they need from eating eucalyptus leaves. But that’s changing, now that those leaves are slowly drying out.

It’s your worst friend — climate change!

Researchers at the University of Sydney in Australia have set up drinking stations (dubbed “Blinky Drinkers”) to observe whether the marsupials are drawn to them. And sure enough, their study has shown that populations benefit from supplemental water — which is a new development for koalas.

Footage showed koalas staying an average of ten minutes at drinking stations. But this data was from last winter, and the data from summer — December to February Down Under — has yet to be analyzed. Keep in mind that summer sun in Gunnedah, the “koala capital of the world,” can ratchet temperatures up to 120 degrees F.

If koalas need to start drinking water, they’ll likely run into significant problems as many of their habitats don’t have sitting water sources. Perhaps Australian elf queen Cate Blanchett could donate some face mists to their cause?


Grist 50: Member Pick

Meet the fixer: This clothing expert revives dead threads.

If you’re a typical American, you probably throw away too many clothes. But the companies behind those clothes have their own disposal problem, too. When a coat has a busted zipper or a truckload of dresses doesn’t sell, customers and retailers return the items — and those returns often end up in a landfill, contributing to the 14 million tons of textiles Americans toss out each year.

If Nicole Bassett has her way, that’s going to change. Bassett cofounded the Renewal Workshop, a tiny company with a giant goal: create a circular economy for the apparel industry (in other words, find a way to reuse perfectly good stuff).

A native of British Columbia who has worked on sustainability initiatives at companies like Patagonia and prAna, Bassett has secured a factory, five partner brands, and a hardy staff of eight. Her startup cleans and fixes clothes that have been returned to partners, then sells the like-new items on the Renewal Workshop website. Some companies have similar programs for their own products, but the Renewal Workshop is “trying to find a solution that works for the whole industry,” says Bassett.

With her outfit growing quickly, she wears every hat — with one exception. “You do not want me fixing a product,” she says with a laugh. “As soon as it involves a sewing machine, I run away.”


Meet all the fixers on this year’s Grist 50.


The Leaden State

The lead poisoning of Flint’s children pales in comparison to rates found in parts of California.

In one Fresno zip code, 13.6 percent of children under the age of 6 have elevated levels of lead in their blood, according to a Reuters report, nearly three times higher than the percentage in Flint during its water crisis.

Close to 30 Golden State neighborhoods were found to have higher rates of childhood lead poisoning than Flint, according to 2012 blood testing data from the California Department of Public Health — and that data covered only about a quarter of California’s zip codes. Statewide, about 2 percent of kids have levels at or over the federal standard, according to the data.

Bill Quirk, a Democratic state assemblyman from the Bay Area, introduced a bill last week to ensure all California children are screened for lead poisoning. “It’s a widespread problem and we have to get a better idea of where the sources of exposure are,” he said.

Lead exposure often comes from peeling house paint or contaminated soil or water. Children with lead poisoning are at risk of developing a host of cognitive disorders.

A Reuters investigation from late last year uncovered nearly 3,000 U.S. locales with higher lead-poisoning rates than Flint, making that preventable disaster just the tip of an alarming iceberg.


Sad!

Major TV networks spent just 50 minutes on climate change — combined — last year.

That’s a dramatic, 66-percent drop in coverage from 2015 across evening and Sunday news programs airing on ABC, CBS, NBC, and Fox, according to a new study from Media Matters. ABC, for one, spent just six minutes on climate issues in 2016.

Media Matters

The networks can’t claim there was a shortage of important climate stories to cover. Hurricane Matthew, the Great Barrier Reef’s continued slow death, record-shattering heat, and the official beginning of the Paris climate deal all took place last year.

Interestingly, the coverage drop doesn’t seem to be an election-year phenomenon. In fact, climate coverage increased by 43 percent during the previous election cycle, between 2011 and 2012.

Media Matters

Other insights from the study:

  • Together, the networks aired five segments of climate science denial from Trump and his team — without rebuttal.
  • No network covered climate change’s impact on national security or the economy.
  • And none of them aired a single segment on the effect a Trump or Clinton presidency would have on the climate — until after the election.

Great to know that TV news is taking the defining issue of our time so seriously.


A rolling Keystone gathers no moss

The Trump administration is about to officially OK the Keystone XL pipeline.

As a 60-day deadline set by President Trump approaches, the State Department plans by Monday to approve a permit for TransCanada to build the pipeline.

Politico first reported the news Thursday. Because the pipeline would cross an international border between Canada and the United States, TransCanada needs State Department approval. Eager to get construction underway after years of delay and ultimately a rejection from President Obama, TransCanada filed a new permit application days after President Trump signed a memorandum intended to expedite the project.

Keystone XL would carry crude oil from the tar sands of Western Canada down through Montana and North Dakota to Nebraska, where it would join up with other oil headed toward the Gulf Coast. Citizen activists in Nebraska were pivotal in the fight against KXL the first time around. TransCanada still needs a permit from Nebraska, which it applied for in February.

A coalition of landowners, Native Americans, and climate activists fended off TransCanada’s advances during the Obama administration. Now they’re gearing up again. “The fight is still there,” Jane Kleeb, founder of Bold Nebraska, an organization that spearheaded opposition to KXL in the state, told me last month. “For seven years, we’ve learned how to organize.”