Briefly

Stuff that matters


here be data

These maps show what Americans think about climate change.

Darker oranges show where most people acknowledge the existence of climate change, and lighter yellows color where more people still aren’t convinced.

Percentage of adults, by state, who think global warming is happening.
Percentage of adults, by state, who think global warming is happening. Yale Program on Climate Change Communication | George Mason Center for Climate Change Communication

What’s surprising is that the divide isn’t all that extreme. Although there’s some visible difference between the coasts and the middle of the country, some 70 percent of survey respondents across the map acknowledge that global warming is, in fact, happening.

The Yale Project for Climate Communication started making these maps in 2014, a simpler, less what-are-facts-even time. So now, with fresh data collected in the days after the 2016 presidential elections, it might come as a shock that most Americans agree on a few important things.

For example, 70 percent of voters polled believe the United States should not withdraw from the Paris climate agreement, while 66 percent believe we should cut our greenhouse gas output with or without the treaty. A whopping 82 percent of people agree we should fund research into renewable energy. Buuuut … only 58 percent say they are actually worried about climate change.

Percentage of adults, by county, who are worried about global warming.
Percentage of adults, by county, who are worried about global warming. Yale Program on Climate Change Communication

You can explore all the results here.


Will they or won’t they?

The European Union is considering an electric car mandate.

After the United Kingdom and France joined the Netherlands and Norway in putting an end date on the sales of fossil fuel–powered cars, the E.U. may set wide-reaching requirements for electric vehicles.

Per reports from Climate Home, the E.U. governing body is mulling an electric and hybrid car quota for automakers by 2030. Though such a proposal would fit with the E.U.’s overall pro-climate stance, it may or may not happen, according to contradictory accounts that have emerged over the past few weeks. The most recent report suggests a proposal is likely.

“They have made it very clear that it is their intention to go to a zero-emissions mandate,” an unnamed source with knowledge of internal E.U. talks told Climate Home. “The car industry has been told to stop complaining about it and start being constructive.”

Policy aside, recent economic forecasts suggest that electric vehicles may account for more than half of global car sales by 2040. Several European companies, including Volvo, are taking the hint. Even scandal-embattled Volkswagen unveiled four new electric cars in April.


it's a bird, it's a plane — it's solarman!

Wind and solar energy are literally (that’s a literal ‘literally’) saving lives.

The increasing presence of wind and solar in the United States helped prevent the premature deaths of up to 12,700 people between 2007 and 2015, according to a new study from Nature Energy.

How’s that? Well, with the rise of clean energy, there’s a reduced risk of exposure to harmful emissions from fossil fuel–burning power plants, like the class of sooty airborne particulate known as PM2.5 (which has been found to damage lungs).

But wind and solar can’t take all the credit — increased regulations and shifting markets helped, too. The study authors report that sulphur dioxide emissions fell from almost 10 million tons in 2007 to 2.7 million tons in 2015 after coal plants were required to complete retrofits to meet air-quality standards.

So that’s one more piece of evidence that wind and solar really do save the day.


flood zone

Trump wants to ignore the effects of climate change when permitting infrastructure projects.

President Trump signed an executive order Tuesday that he said will streamline the environmental review required to get large public construction efforts — like roads, bridges, and buildings — off the ground.

From the gilded lobby of Trump Tower, the president proclaimed that the executive order would repair our “badly broken” process for garnering permits for infrastructure projects.

The policy sets a goal of two years for finishing a permitting process and assigns a lead government agency to helm each approval. The order also rescinds an Obama-era requirement that government-funded buildings take into account likely sea-level rise in design and construction. (States and other local agencies, however, will still be able to establish stricter permitting practices.)

Updating America’s “crumbling infrastructure” became a central tenet of Trump’s presidential campaign — and he promised billions to the effort. Trump called the current permitting process a “massive, self-inflicted wound on our country.”

“It’s disgraceful,” the president said.

The White House argues the order will bring “accountability and discipline” back to the permitting process. But many environmentalists decry it as an obvious attempt to skirt environmental rules — and cite it as further evidence of Trump’s anti-climate change agenda.


Standing Rock

The security firm that tracked DAPL opponents denies providing illegal services.

Last week, North Carolina–based TigerSwan answered a lawsuit brought by the North Dakota Private Investigative and Security Board alleging it operated without a license for months during anti-pipeline protests.

In its filing, TigerSwan describes its business in North Dakota as “management consulting” as opposed to security work. While the firm admitted to making recommendations to local law enforcement, it claims it “did not undertake or furnish ‘private security service’ or ‘private investigative service’” in the state.

In early June, Grist and the Intercept published details from situation reports prepared by TigerSwan for its client, Energy Transfer Partners — the company constructing the Dakota Access Pipeline. The documents describe the firm’s military-style surveillance tactics against anti-pipeline activists and their allies during the protests. That month, a spokesperson for Energy Transfer Partners said it was no longer employing TigerSwan — though Louisiana later denied TigerSwan a license to work on another Energy Transfer Partners pipeline.

The North Dakota board sued TigerSwan in late June, seeking thousands of dollars in penalties. TigerSwan says the regulations referred to in the complaint are vague and asks for the court to dismiss the lawsuit.


the social science network

Your previously worthless tweets could be used for science.

There’s an enormous amount of information posted to social media sites every day, and increasing ability to sift it for patterns and trends. Scientists could potentially find useful data about ecosystems’ health on Twitter, according to a report in The Conversation.

Researchers recently tested this hypothesis with 300,000 tweets sent from the Great Barrier Reef. They filtered for useful tweets — those containing pictures or observations about wildlife, coral bleaching, or other environmental factors — and then plotted them on a map of where they had been sent.

The Conversation

Even though the tweets came from amateurs with no intention of participating in a citizen science experiment, passive info like location tags and timestamps could give scientists useful data, especially in places without other methods of environmental monitoring in place.

As the researchers write, “Think of it as citizen science by people who don’t even realise they’re citizen scientists.”


doomsday trippers

Glacier National Park is overcrowded. Thanks, climate change.

A record-breaking 1 million people visited Glacier in July, up 23 percent from last year. Park officials are stuck dealing with overcrowded parking lots, more medical emergencies, and a shortage of open campsites.

While the number of visitors has fluctuated in past decades, it’s been on the rise over the past five years. Some attribute the park’s popularity to low gas prices (perfect for road trips!) and all the envy-inducing photos making their way to Instagram, while others blame our old pal climate change: All but 26 of the 150 glaciers that existed in Glacier National Park in the late 1800s have melted away, and scientists say it’s “inevitable” we’ll lose the rest. Such predictions have prompted a wave of “doomsday tourists” who want to catch a glimpse of climate change in action.

“People tell us they want to see glaciers before they’re gone,” Pamela Smith, a Glacier campground volunteer, told the Missoulian. “They have come here to see the impacts of climate change for themselves.”