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I thought the green job market was hot!

"If the green job market's so hot, why can't I find a job?" I've been talking up the rising eco-job market so much that I should have known there would be a backlash. It came most recently from an exasperated job seeker who's failed to land a decent job, let alone get an interview -- or even find appropriate positions to apply for. "Is this the 'hidden' job market I've heard about?" she asked. "It seems downright invisible!" Hmm ... is it possible that I could be, well, you know, um ... wrong? (Heavens no!) Let's explore. The environmental careers …

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Business leaders honed in on climate, carbon, and concrete at Davos

The snow at Davos didn't melt away worries about climate change. Photo: Benjamin Zurbriggen/World Economic Forum There was something different in the air at this year's Davos gathering of global movers and shakers -- and not just an increase in CO2 concentration. Instead of the irrational exuberance of the 1990s or the celebrity-studded glitz of recent years, we found upbeat but serious discussion of big issues -- climate change in particular. A few days before the World Economic Forum opened its doors on Jan. 24, people were fretting that for the first time in living memory the snows might not …

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Now Who’s a Moonbeam?

On heels of climate report, governments and businesses get real Heeding a call from French President Jacques Chirac, 46 nations are backing a plan to create a powerful new U.N. Environment Organization that could police climate offenders. Egregious emitters Russia, China, India, and the U.S. didn't leap up and down volunteering to join, but Chirac will keep pushing, since the "very survival of humankind hangs in the balance." Whatevs. In other news, 12 corporations including Nike, Polaroid, Sony, and IBM pledged to cut emissions totaling 10 million tons annually by 2010 as part of the World Wildlife Fund's "Climate Savers" …

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But Wait, There’s More

Wal-Mart CEO announces new energy-focused sustainability initiative First Prince Charles jets across the Atlantic just to accept an eco-award, and now he's hanging out with the likes of Wal-Mart chief Lee Scott. Is there anything His Royal Highness won't do to piss off self-righteous greens? Has he considered biting the head off an endangered salamander? While we await his next move, we applaud the latest: inviting Scott to speak to some 400 execs at a London conference on greening business. It gave Scott the chance to unveil "Sustainability 360," a new initiative that will involve employees, customers, and communities in …

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All these green initiatives, oy

Wal-Mart CEO Lee Scott just announced a comprehensive new initiative called "Sustainability 360," which will attempt to infuse environmental concern in every part of the company's operations: "Sustainability 360 takes in our entire company - our customer base, our supplier base, our associates, the products on our shelves, the communities we serve," said Scott. "And we believe every business can look at sustainability in this way. In fact, in light of current environmental trends, we believe they will and soon." Reuters coverage here. I tell you, as someone who's obviously (obviously, right?) using green issues as a big smoke screen …

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Business is already acting on the climate threat — and waiting for Washington to catch up

You don't need to look for receding glaciers or pore over the latest IPCC report to know that climate change is already happening. Just talk to Diavik Diamond Mines Inc. Captains of industry want to know what's up ahead. Photo: iStockphoto The company relies on ice bridges to move equipment and materials through the northern regions of Canada. Last winter, however, the ice never thickened enough to allow transport of its heaviest trucks, so Diavik had to pay the additional cost of shipping materials by helicopter. While a dwindling number of business associations and lobbyists still dispute the science of …

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There’s nothing healthy about the American Dietary Association’s addiction to corporate cash.

Hey, the American Dietetic Association is having a big convention in Philly next fall. The ADA, which represents 65,000 dietitians, claims to ... ... serve the public by promoting optimal nutrition, health and well-being. ADA members are the nation's food and nutrition experts, translating the science of nutrition into practical solutions for healthy living. Ah, the experts are getting together! Maybe they'll take a critical look at soaring diabetes and obesity rates, and perhaps brainstorm ways of linking consumers directly to fresh-food sources. Then again, probably not. The conference, it turns out, is funded by major food conglomerates, which will …

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Doug Koplow, subsidies researcher and founder of Earth Track, answers questions

Doug Koplow. With what environmental organization are you affiliated? I'm the founder of Earth Track in Cambridge, Mass., which focuses on increasing visibility of environmentally harmful subsidies. This visibility comes through direct analysis, consolidation of research from around the world, and descriptive materials understandable by general audiences. Subsidies transfer value from the public sector to private interests, sometimes in cash, but more often via complex and hard-to-track methods. A good general observation is the quicker your eyes glaze over reading eligibility requirements, the bigger the subsidy is likely to be. At an estimated trillion dollars per year globally, these subsidies …

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Upward Mobility

ExxonMobil says it's taking climate change seriously -- seriously Guess who said this about climate change: "We know enough now -- or, society knows enough now -- that the risk is serious and action should be taken." No, not some dirty hippie, but an executive from oil behemoth ExxonMobil. (Ow, our jaw!) Greenhouse-gas reduction has become a theme of Exxon's advertising, and the company is participating in an analysis by green think tank Resources for the Future of government options for addressing climate change. An Exxon spokesflack declares that the company's position on climate change has been "widely misunderstood," but …

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Valley of the Dollars

Clean-energy investments add jobs, moolah to Silicon Valley Remember the U.S. excuse for not adopting green policies, the one about hurting the economy? Yeah, that's out the window. A new report says Silicon Valley added 33,000 jobs in 2006 after five years of job losses, thanks in large part to gigantarific investments in green technologies. "There's a lot of excitement about the green economy," says Doug Henton of Collaborative Economics, which produced the report. "I think it's real." Normally Doug's word is enough for us, but check out these actual numbers, too: "cleantech" funding increased from $141 million in 2005 …