In Stockholm, the depths of winter can stretch out over nearly half the calendar year. Last winter, the first reported snowfall came on Oct. 25, and the last sighting wasn’t until April 20.

With six months of potential snow, the task of keeping the city’s commuters moving and working can be a real challenge for local government. At the moment, Stockholm uses a relatively standard snow-clearing strategy that differs little from what other harsh-winter cities have chosen to do. They focus their plows first on major thoroughfares, then on downtown areas close to major workplaces and construction sites, and finally move on to smaller roads, neighborhoods, and schools.

But some in Stockholm’s city government have begun to suspect that these longstanding strategies may not best serve all of the city’s residents. By focusing on city-center workplaces and construction sites, the Green Party’s Daniel Helldén suggests, the city is implicitly ignoring the places that “vulnerable groups,” including women and families, frequent most often. His solution? Something he’s calling “gender-equal plowing.”