Skip to content Skip to site navigation

Cities

Comments

Deep thought of the day

As rising energy prices and better urban planning push the affluent back to city centers, the poor and working class will be pushed out to the suburbs. Soon, we'll see blight, crime, the drug trade, and other social pathologies where we have been accustomed to seeing the American Dream. "Inner city" and "outer suburb" will flip their cultural connotations. It will be confusing.

Read more: Cities

Comments

Cities worldwide will turn off lights for Earth Hour

Mark your calendar for March 29, when cities around the world will switch off non-critical lights at 8:00 p.m. for an awareness-raising Earth Hour. At present, 24 cities -- with a total population of some 30 million people -- plan to participate in the energy-saving symbolism, from Toronto to Tel Aviv, Bangkok to Brisbane, Canberra to Copenhagen, and first Earth Hour participant Sydney to copycat event holder San Francisco. Thousands of individuals and businesses have also signed on to come to the dark side.

Read more: Cities, Climate & Energy

Comments

How to kill coal in 10 years

We know that coal is the enemy of the human race, what with carbon emissions, deadly air pollution, and unsafe and destructive mining practices. The supply of coal is becoming more problematic as well: recently, a Wall Street Journal article described a "coal-price surge," and Richard Heinberg has warned that coal may peak much sooner than most people expect. So what's to like? Not much. But since coal-fired plants provide almost half of our electricity, we can't get rid of coal unless we find either a way to replace it or a way to reduce the use of electricity. Recently, …

Read more: Cities, Climate & Energy

Comments

A breathless appraisal of Lance’s new bicycle mecca and mission

Lance Armstrong will soon unveil his 18,000-square-foot Austin-based bike shop, Mellow Johnny's (named after the Tour de France's yellow jersey -- or "maillot jaune"). The goal of the shop is to promote bike culture and bike commuting: "This city is exploding downtown. Are all these people in high rises going to drive everywhere? We have to promote (bike) commuting..." Showers and a locker room will allow commuters who don't have facilities at their offices to ride downtown, store their bikes at the shop, bathe and catch a ride on a pedicab or walk the rest of the way to work. …

Read more: Cities, Living

Comments

Engineer plans to sell compressed-air car in India within a year

Could folks in India be driving a car that runs on compressed air within a year? French engineer Guy Negre says it will be so. Tata Motors has backed his invention: a five-seater called the OneCAT, which would produce no emissions and cost around $5,000. "The first buyers [of the car] will be people who care about the environment," says Negre, who hopes that investors around the world will set up factories to build the car using local materials, cutting down on shipping emissions. "I really hope he succeeds," says Terry Spall from the U.K. Institution of Mechanical Engineers. "It …

Comments

What would you build on the land near the iconic Hollywood sign?

Get out your checkbooks, folks: The mountaintop property located just above the "H" in the iconic "Hollywood" sign is now for sale. The asking price? A sweet $22 million. Two years ago, Los Angeles officials and conservationists tried to purchase the land atop the 1,820-foot Cahuenga Peak to create a city park, but were unable to raise the funds. No matter what is constructed there -- homes, additional words (I see an advertising opportunity, Planet Hollywood!) -- one of the city's most famous views could be forever altered. So what would you put up there? I'm thinking wind turbines.

Read more: Cities

Comments

NYC nightclub groovin’ to a green tune

Dirty dancing is so 2007. An NYC hot spot aiming for LEED certification could become the first eco-club in the U.S., W Magazine reports: Jon B., owner of Manhattan nightclubs Home and Guest House, plans to open Greenhouse -- the first eco club in the U.S. -- in time to make it New York Fashion Week's buzziest hot spot. In the three-story space on 10th Avenue, LED lights replace standard bulbs, the toilets are programmed to use less water, furniture is covered with recycled material, and an organic drinks menu is in the works. Hey, Jon B., put me on …

Read more: Cities, Living

Comments

Abe Lincoln’s summer home goes green

Does this building look LEED certified to you? Well, look again. This is part of Abe Lincoln's summer home complex near Washington, D.C., and after a seven-year restoration, it's the first-ever historic monument to receive the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Certification from the U.S. Green Building Council. The National Trust for Historic Preservation rehabilitated the historic building in a way that minimized adverse environmental impact. This meant restoring as much of the existing fabric of a building as possible, rather than generating new materials and sending the existing materials to a landfill. It also meant updating systems …

Read more: Cities

Comments

A poet takes the measure of Portland — on foot

Starting early this century, poet and professor David Oates set out to walk the boundary line that Oregon drew around the city of Portland decades ago to concentrate its development and discourage sprawl. What is today called "the New Urbanism" is not new in Portland: it's been part of the political process since l973. As Oates writes in a forward to a book he recently published about his adopted state's experiment in urban utopianism: We hope to grow in, and in some places, up. To get richer in connections and cleverness -- to get deeper -- instead of wider, flatter, …

Read more: Cities

Comments

Spearheading transit for livable cities at 93

I recently ended 100 days without Grist. And wouldn't you know, the title of the first post I saw, "No climate for old men," spoke directly to the reason I was away. No, I wasn't with the McCain campaign. Rather, I was immersed in a project, spearheaded by a really old man, that could become a terrific tool for beating back the climate crisis. That man is 93-year-old Ted Kheel, legendary New York labor-lawyer-turned-environmentalist. His project is a study of the feasibility of financing free mass transit in New York City through congestion pricing and other charges on driving. I …

Read more: Cities, Climate & Energy