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Enterprise and other rental companies move into car-share market

Enterprise Rent-a-Car is zooming ahead with a car-sharing program à la the successful Zipcar. The Enterprise venture, called WeCar, started on the campus of St. Louis's Washington University last month, but will kick off in urban style in the city downtown next week. WeCar will begin with nine Toyota Prius hybrids and will target employees who commute without a car to work and then need a vehicle during the day. (Zipcar, which targets residential areas, is not available in St. Louis.) WeCar joins a U-Haul program with the self-explanatory name U Car Share, available in college cities like Ann Arbor, …

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Fast-growing Atlanta loses rights to major source of drinking water

An 18-year water war between Georgia, Alabama, and Florida has come to an end of sorts: A federal appellate court has voided an Army Corps of Engineers agreement that would have given Georgia the rights to nearly 25 percent of federal reservoir Lake Lanier as a source of drinking water for metro Atlanta. Alabama and Florida had sued over the plan, saying it would siphon off water that would otherwise flow to their states. Atlanta, which has been accused of not being mindful of water resources while encouraging rampant growth, is "the big loser here," says water-law expert George William …

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EPA set to kibosh Mississippi Delta boondoggle

Successive presidential administrations -- including the current one -- have tried to rein in the Army Corps of Engineers and its projects, which are mostly known for their tangy combination of high cost, arguable utility, and disregard for the environment. Tried -- and largely failed, thanks to the level-10 force fields erected by congresscritters who covet the flood of Corps project dollars into their districts. So it's startling and welcome news that apparently, the EPA is initiating the process to veto a massive Corps project known as the Yazoo Pumps. The pump project is situated in the Mississippi-Yazoo Delta, a …

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Polluting vehicles must pay to drive in London under new scheme

Starting today, high-pollutin' trucks and buses will be fined for driving in London's new Low Emission Zone, which stretches for a not-too-shabby 610 square miles. Diesel vehicles weighing over 13 tons must register with the city transportation agency and have their emissions monitored; vehicles can be charged up to $400 for exceeding exhaust limits. A system of cameras will catch unregistered vehicles, which can be fined up to $2,000. After July, the rule will be expanded to apply to vehicles weighing over 4 tons, which would include large vans and ambulances. The zone is "the first in Britain and the …

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Commission approves NYC congestion charge

A New York commission has approved a plan to charge a fee to drivers entering Manhattan during peak hours. The proposal, aimed at reducing traffic congestion and pollution, differs only slightly from what Mayor Michael Bloomberg proposed in April; it would charge $8 to drivers entering a certain area between 6 a.m. and 6 p.m., and put the funding toward public transit. The plan must now be approved by the city council, Bloomberg, and the state legislature -- where some expect it will hit a snarl. But if the state does approve the plan, the federal government has allocated a …

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Majora Carter

If this doesn't get you in your gut, you've got serious problems:

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New CIA campus goes green

The CIA has apparently been green for years -- yet somehow, nobody managed to find out. But the secret-keepers' Chantilly, Va., campus was just outed as neerg gniog (that's code for "going green"). The new campus is LEED certified and features a green roof, preferred parking for carpoolers, energy-efficient equipment, waterless urinals, and more. We'd tell you more, but then we'd have to kill you. Or kidnap you and fly you to secret prisons offshore to be tortured. Or maybe, just maybe, we'll go old-school and support a coup against you. (But don't worry, we'll buy carbon credits to offset …

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Mexico City encourages transit ridership with women-only buses

Women in Mexico City have long been deterred from riding public transportation by the very real possibility of being groped or verbally harassed while packed in with other passengers. "A woman could enter a metro car a virgin and come out pregnant," says one female rider. The subway system has female-only cars during rush hour to address the problem, but now city officials are taking it a step further, introducing women's-only buses along three busy routes. Women's buses, designated by a pink sign in the window, will be added to 15 more routes by April. The city's female riders are …

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Eating extremely local pigs

For pork lovers squeamish about hunting, check out this fascinating account of an intrepid urban farmer who doesn't let the fact she lives in the hood in Oakland, Calif., get in the way of her commitment to eating local. Very local. Like backyard local. So ... here's the piggies on day one. And last days.  Read up from the bottom. She's a beautiful writer, and she has some insightful things to say.

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Report warns of new security threats from climate change

Climate change will create a range of new security threats, including millions of displaced climate refugees, according to a new report from Britain's Oxford Research Group. The report forecasts a tumultuous climate-changed future by as early as 2050 where some 200 million climate refugees fleeing environmental disasters in their homelands will try to immigrate to the U.K. and other wealthy nations. To his credit, the report's author recommends actually tackling climate change now to avoid encountering such a situation instead of beefing up anti-immigration policies and fortifying police and other armed forces. However, given the current pace of action on …