Crazy Europeans think people are more important than cars

All across Europe, urban policy is shifting to favor humans over automobiles. What are they thinking? The New York Times takes a look.


Bike lanes create jobs

The title of this post should really be "Bike lanes create jobs, duhhhhhhhhhh." A new study from the University of Massachusetts is only the latest evidence that bike infrastructure projects create more jobs than road infrastructure -- but the message …


The U.S. is building an interstate highway system for bikes

One day you'll be able to head out on the highway WITHOUT getting your motor running first. Take that, Steppenwolf! Last week the Association of American State Highway and Transportation Officials breathed new life into a long-fallow plan to build an …


Five provocative ways to think about cities and neighborhoods

Want to be more mindful of your city? Here are some great suggestions on how to make that happen.


Great places: how livable streets make us happier humans

My dense, walkable, transit-rich neighborhood does a lot of great things for my carbon footprint. But what it does for my soul might, in the end, be more important.

Business & Technology

New solar cells can be printed right onto buildings

The world's largest dye-sensitized solar cell has just made an appearance. These cells have a couple of major advantages over traditional solar cells: one, they're incredibly cheap, and two, they can be printed right onto the materials used to make …


Russia lets VIPs ignore traffic laws

Do you hate sh*tty drivers? Well, in Soviet Russia, sh*tty driver hates YOU! Moscow's road rage problem is epic, perhaps due to the fact that their traffic solution involves giving special police-style sirens to "VIP" drivers (read: 900-plus important people, …

Climate Change

Which cities can best adapt to climate change?

Here are the most resilient -- and most vulnerable -- cities to climate change.

Climate Change

Me, on Seattle public radio, talking cities and climate

On KUOW's "The Conversation," David Roberts talks about the grim prospects for national or international climate policy and the rays of hope coming from cities.