Cities

Kick some asphalt

A Portland group pulverizes pavement to make way for green space

Have you ever gotten so sick of the sight of asphalt that you just wanted to take a sledgehammer to it and start smashing? Meet Depave, the Portland, Ore., group that lives the dream. Since 2007, this all-volunteer squad of pavement-bashers has ripped the asphalt and concrete from 14 sites in the Portland area, making way for community gardens, sustainable schoolyards, and green space.

Dwelling on green design

Green design finds a home in Dwell magazine [AUDIO]

Since its launch in 2000, the magazine Dwell has helped popularize green architecture and design. Alison Stewart of PBS speaks with editor Aaron Britt

disaster fatigue

The San Bruno gas fire and the futility of harping on fossil-fuel disasters

An explosion from a ruptured natural-gas line killed at least four people and destroyed an entire city block in the San Francisco suburb of San Bruno on Thursday night. But people don't need hectoring told-you-so's in response to all these disasters. They need to see a vision of a sustainable future that actually looks appealing.

RUNNING GAME

Most walkable football stadiums

Walk Score ranks the most walkable NFL stadiums in honor of the season's kickoff. The really important public policy implication here is, uh, that's it's fun to look at it.

The Kids Aren't All Right

A shopping center tries to repel teens with the buzz of a powerful Mosquito

D.C.'s Gallery Place has gotten so fed up with teens lounging near the property that they've imported a device called the Mosquito to drive them off.

bike like an egyptian

Hundreds of bikes re-cycled into modern-day obelisk

The ancient Egyptians erected obelisks out of hundreds of pounds of stone. Modern Americans erect obelisks out of hundreds of bicycles. Check out whether they're compensating for something.

Slumming it

Urban design lessons from the world's poorest neighborhoods

Pavlina Ilieva and Kuo Pao Lian aren't out to sugarcoat slums. But they suggest that those who live in the most privileged enclaves could learn a lot.

LEED was an offer they couldn't refuse

How Chicago became the city of green shoulders

What started as a simple beautification project -- flower planters, parkways, and whatnot -- eventually led Chicago to take on the larger challenge of green building. A leading architect describes how leadership from the mayor's office, key changes in the city's building permit program, and cooperation from developers made it happen.

How green was my roof

Chicago takes the LEED in eco building

Skyscrapers and other enormous buildings are environmental horror shows. So you might think that Chicago -- birthplace of the skyscraper and home to nine of the world's 100 tallest buildings -- is like a City of the Eco-Damned. Not so. The Windy City has plenty of proof that it's building a foundation on building green.

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