Cities

City residents emit less CO2, study says

Residents of the 100 largest metropolitan areas in the United States emit less carbon dioxide pollution per capita than the U.S. average, according to a new study. The Brookings Institution analyzed data on household and transportation energy use and found that the average U.S. resident was responsible for about 2.87 tons of carbon pollution a year, but that residents of the U.S.’s 100 largest metro areas had footprints of just 2.47 tons a year on average. Among the 100 largest cities, Honolulu residents were responsible for the least per capita emissions: about 1.5 tons per person per year. Lexington, Ky., …

Notable quotable

Yes we can! (ride bikes)

“It’s time that the entire country learn from what’s happening right here in Portland with mass transit and bicycle lanes and funding alternative means of transportation. That’s the kind of solution that we need for America.” – Barack Obama, speaking to a rally in Portland, Ore., where an estimated 8,000 out of 75,000 attendees arrived on bikes (via Streetsblog)

Surely there must be some mistake

Branch of U.S. federal government accidentally passes bill that would provide $1.7 billion in grant funding for public transit.

He doesn’t say so explicitly …

… but this Paul Krugman column is about placemaking. On that note, don’t miss our Smart(ish) Cities series.

Greens celebrate two holidays today

If you saw a tiger riding a two-wheeler to the office this morning, that’s because it’s Endangered Species Bike to Work Day. Wait, wait, we’re getting a memo — oh, actually, it’s both Endangered Species Day and Bike to Work Day. (Then what the hell was that tiger doing?) In honor of Bike to Work Day, bicyclists in many cities picked up free swag along their commute routes this morning. In honor of Endangered Species Day, nearly one-third of the world’s species went extinct between 1970 and 2007. That’s 25 percent of land-based wildlife, 28 percent of salt-water animals, and …

Smart-growth advocates offer tips for changing your neck of the woods

This week we’ve profiled several cities that are changing the way their residents live, work, and get around — all with an eye toward fighting climate change and building a more sustainable future. So what can you do if your community hasn’t seen the light? We asked our sources for advice, and here’s what they had to say. Kimber Lanning. “Buy local whenever possible. Whether you’re hiring someone to work on your air conditioner, buying dog food, or buying produce, buy it from your neighbor whenever you can. If you think it’s more expensive, think about a city with nothing …

Smart(ish) Cities series ends, sustainability efforts march on

By now, you may have forgotten that Portland was ever crowned the Miss Universe of Sustainability, and have started packing up your bicycles and solar panels for the big move to Syracuse or Tampa. OK, maybe you’re not thinking of uprooting yourself and your family. More likely, you’re evaluating your own city to figure out what green things it’s got going for it, where it lags behind, and how you can make a difference where you live. Who knew affordable housing was a key to sustainability, or that vehicle-miles traveled matters as much as the number of smog particles lingering …

How three Rust Belt cities are changing

For more on Rust Belt cities, see our full feature on sustainability initiatives underway in Cleveland. It may not be intuitive to link an area historically associated with steel mills, coal mining, and automobile assembly lines to sustainable development. But green growth is catching on in the Rust Belt, long an economically unendowed area of the country — and its manufacturing-heavy past is coming in handy in emerging fields like biotech, nanotech, and hydrogen cars. Here’s what three cities are doing to green up their acts. A new Destiny emerges in Syracuse. Image: destinyusa.com Syracuse, N.Y. In late 2007, Syracuse …

Prius sales top 1 million

Worldwide sales of Toyota’s Prius hybrid have passed the 1 million mark, the auto company announced Thursday. The world’s first mass-produced hybrid was introduced in Japan in 1997 and in other markets in 2000. While it was at the time a risky business venture, it didn’t take long for the word Prius — Latin for “to go before” — to become synonymous with popular hybrid technology (and yuppie environmentalism). Nearly 60 percent of the 1.028 million Priuses/Prii/Priora sold have been to customers in North America. Inspired to join the crowd? “This is a special vehicle, and as fuel prices keep …

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