Skip to content Skip to site navigation

Climate & Energy

Comments

Note to media: Enough with the multiple hedges on climate science!

In an otherwise fascinating story on the growing "icebreaker gap" in the rapidly defrosting Arctic Ocean, NYT reporter Andy Revkin writes: Even with the increasing summer retreats of sea ice, which many polar scientists say probably are being driven in part by global warming caused by humans, there will always be enough ice in certain parts of the Arctic to require icebreakers. I do not view a quadruple-hedged climate impact attribution as acceptable for a major media outlet: "many" and "polar" and "probably" and "in part"! It isn't just "many polar scientists" who say this, it is pretty much "the …

Read more: Climate & Energy

Comments

Electric-car visionary would overhaul the way we get around

Could the global auto infrastructure be overhauled in a way that's profitable for business, cheap for drivers, and easy on the planet? Meet Better Place's Shai Agassi and his plans for an electric-car future, featured in the latest issue of Wired. In Agassi's vision, gas stations are replaced with omnipresent recharging spots for electric cars. Vehicles are cheap, perhaps even free; money is made off electricity, and renewable energy is incentivized. Drivers purchase electricity on subscription, paying for unlimited miles, a certain number of miles per month, or pay-as-you-go. No time to recharge? Head to your nearest battery exchange station …

Comments

McCain suggests renegotiating Colorado River compact to benefit Ariz., Nev., and Calif.

What epic gaffe could unite Colorado's Democratic Senator Ken Salazar -- "over my dead body" -- and Republican U.S. Senate candidate Bob Schaffer -- "Over my cold, dead, political carcass"? That would be Arizona Senator John McCain telling The Pueblo Chieftan on Thursady that he wants to renegotiate the famous 1922 Colorado River compact to take water from the so-called upper basin states, including Colo. and N.M., where the river originates and give it to lower basin states like his home state of Ariz.: "I don't think there's any doubt the major, major issue is water and can be as …

Comments

Bill Clinton gets into the weeds of energy policy

Photo: Brent Danley On Monday, Bill Clinton gave the opening remarks at the National Clean Energy Summit, speaking for almost an hour and taking questions for another 30 minutes. The energy issue is hot politics these days, but those hoping to witness some of the '90s-vintage Clinton political jujitsu left disappointed. Instead they were treated to -- or, depending on their tolerance for wonkery, forced to endure -- an extended disquisition on the finer points of energy policy. Applause lines were scarce. The top-line message of Clinton's talk was simple: the key to achieving the greenhouse-gas emissions required is to …

Comments

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer says he’d invest in clean energy

The Wall Street Journal asked House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-Md.) how he would spend $10 billion of the country's monetary resources. He says it should be spent on clean energy: A dramatic investment in clean energy would be the most effective check on aggressive petroregimes from Moscow to Tehran. It would be the best long-term solution to global warming. And energy independence is the most effective step we can take for American families staggering under the burden of high gas prices. That's because the forces that have produced this summer's record prices are not going away. We are facing …

Comments

A roundup of energy and climate news from the U.K.

Like pretty much every other English person I know, I'm currently on holiday in France. The Vendee region makes for a pleasant alternative to Britain at this time of year, and just down the road is La Rochelle, which was part of England until, oh, about 500 years ago. The two nations are deep in a classic love-hate relationship: They look enviously at our pop music and entrepreneurial flair while understandably scorning our food, ugly cities, and unsophisticated habits. We meanwhile grudgingly admire their ability to take themselves seriously, build proper infrastructure, and keep the country looking impeccable -- all …

Read more: Climate & Energy

Comments

video

Speaker’s radio address aimed at blunting GOP message on energy

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) took up the "drill more, drill now" refrain Saturday in the Democrats' weekly radio address, offering up a list of policy proposals intended to show that Democrats do indeed care about high gas and energy prices. Here's the YouTube version (text can be found here): Pelosi bashes the Bush administration for failing to deal with energy issues for the past eight years, and she offers up all the obligatory slams against Big Oil. It's not just about drilling, she reminds listeners, outlining proposals to invest in mass transit, tighten mileage standards, and fund clean energy …

Comments

Reid pulls together Dem bigwigs (and T. Boone) to hash over energy policy

I'm here at UNLV for the National Clean Energy Summit being thrown by Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and the Center for American Progress. I guess they're playing off Las Vegas's international reputation for bringing water and air conditioning to the desert clean energy. Bill Clinton is speaking in a few minutes. And hey, is that James Carville I see wandering around by the stage? What's he doing here? I'm told Reid got this thing going long before the recent drilling brouhaha, but it certainly has taken on an added salience in the current political environment. I'm keen to see …

Comments

video

Mississippi Senate race goes negative as Dems attack incumbent over Big Oil

The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee is targeting Sen. Roger Wicker (R-Miss.) for supporting Big Oil. A new ad highlights the fact that he voted to give oil companies tax breaks and voted against legislation to curb speculation in the oil market. "While oil companies make record profits, Roger Wicker votes to give them $28 billion in tax breaks," the ad says. "On Election Day, make sure Roger Wicker feels your pain." Mississippi's Republican Gov. Haley Barbour tapped Wicker last November to temporarily assume Trent Lott's seat after the senator resigned just one year into a six-year term. Now Wicker must …

Comments

The good, the bad, and the ugly of the ‘Gang of 10′ drilling deal, part 2

Major legislative compromises are unsatisfying by design. They invariably have good, bad, and ugly parts. I have previously argued that the Democrats would be smart to compromise on offshore drilling. The rest of this series will examine whether the so-called Gang-of-10 deal is in fact a smart compromise. That question can be rephrased as, does the good beat out the bad and the ugly (as, of course, Clint did in the epic spaghetti western)? I will focus here on the main good-and-bad pieces of the "New Energy Reform Act of 2008." "Part 3" will cover the smaller pieces, including the …