Climate & Energy

When the wind blows

Wind power gets a bad rap after the Texas blackouts

The Competitive Enterprise Institute's Iain Murray warns of the dangers of renewables: While we're on the subject of renewables: here's further proof that wind power is no panacaea for the nation's looming electricity crisis. The wind dropped in Texas, and caused blackouts. Indeed, an unexpected demand spike not met by coal-fired power plants wind power caused irreparable harm by unfairly favoring the unwashed masses over "large industrial customers who are paid to reduce power use when emergencies occur" on Tuesday. Tuesday was the very day nuclear, natural gas, and coal power demonstrated their unfailing reliability to 3 million Floridians. More Murray: Meanwhile, in Denmark, wind turbines are exploding. Dramatic video (provenance uncertain, so may not be genuine) here. This follows the fatal collapse of a wind tower in Oregon last summer. They also come with environmental costs of their own. Now, of course, all energy production comes with risks, but wind power has such a positive image that people think of it as completely safe, environmentally-friendly and reliable. That's not the case. I, for one, would take mountaintop removal, mercury emissions, and global warming over dangerous wind power any day!

Clinton talks up clean energy at Houston energy summit

The Greater Houston Partnership held an energy forum Thursday to which all of the presidential candidates were invited and only one showed up: Hillary Clinton. Surrounded by folks from the energy industry, days before the crucial Texas primary, Clinton elected not to tell Big Oil what it wanted to hear. “I do not believe that now is the time when subsidies for the oil companies are necessary and appropriate,” she said in her speech. “It is now time to subsidize new forms of energy.” Clinton also boosted green-collar jobs, green building, solar power, and higher fuel-economy standards. The reaction of …

ABEC ads in Ohio

Listen Play a creepy coal ad, by ABEC Speaking of fossil shenanigans, check out the blitz of advertising coal front group ABEC is running in Ohio in advance of the presidential primary there. I’ve been trying to pick the creepiest one, but’s pretty tough. I think the two winners are the audio ad to your right and the print ad below the fold: For non-bullshit-laden analysis of the benefits of green energy for Ohio, see … Green Energy Ohio.

‘Responsible Resources’ is the new ‘sound science’

Oh goodness, there are fossil shenanigans going on everywhere you look. You have to read this article in The Hill with talmudic attention to detail to figure out what’s going on with this new "educational" group — "Responsible Resources" — formed by ex-House staffers. Here’s a hint: In its ad, Responsible Resources says, however, that taxes on energy companies are a threat to affordable and reliable energy. Remember, "taxes" here equals "removal of recent subsidies." Later we hear them lamenting that lawmakers don’t know the "simple facts" of the energy debate, like the fact that "there are more than 2 …

EPA releases unconvincing justification for denying California waiver

For the long wait that preceded it, the U.S. EPA’s just-released justification for disallowing California to regulate vehicle greenhouse-gas emissions is rather anticlimactic. The 48-page document argues that California lacks the “compelling and extraordinary conditions” required for special regulatory permission, because the rest of the nation is also affected by climate change. Critics of the EPA (including the agency’s own staff) challenge that interpretation — and say that California’s long coastline, massive agricultural industry, and propensity for wildfires do make it more vulnerable to climate-change effects than other states.

Flat earth firsters?

A celebration of hot air on Broadway

No, you couldn't make this one up. It's a meeting, starting Sunday, of hundreds of "scientists" and propagandists, convening to denounce the proposition that global warming is real. It's like a gathering of the Flat Earth Society. Or, since this meeting literally is taking place on Broadway, it recalls the great Preston Jones play, The Last Meeting of the Knights of the White Magnolia, which did run briefly on Broadway.