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We bad

In his question/rant for Gore, Sen. Kit Bond (R-Mo.) cited a quote from Gore's interview with Grist. It's this: "I believe it's appropriate to have an over-representation of factual presentations on how dangerous it is." The quote bounced around skeptic circles for a long time a while back. Suffice to say, it's been yanked from context and grossly misinterpreted. See the full story here.

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Liveblogging is the new black

Gore is just arriving at the Senate. The cameras are clicking! The crowd is buzzing! David is liveblogging! Join me below the fold. Sen. Boxer is looking quite stylish, no? Rules are being introduced. Hopefully it won't take 15 minutes like in the House. Uh oh. Inhofe's going already. Whining about getting the testimony late. Whining about the record. Whining about how much time he gets. Wow, it's clear that Inhofe and Boxer loathe one another. And ... now they're bickering. Lamar Alexander introduces Gore, and mentions he (Alexander) believes in anthropogenic global warming. Now a second introduction, from Sen. …

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He was nice to Gore

One thing worth noting from this morning's hearing: Dingell, whom I expected to challenge Gore aggressively, asked him not a single question. In fact, he was enormously respectful of Gore. And the way he attempted to pronounce Bjorn Lomborg's name made it clear that it was not him who invited Lomborg. Maybe he really has had a change of heart on this.

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Gore errata

If you just can't get enough livebloggin', Brian Beutler also had a running commentary on Gore's testimony over at his blog. Meanwhile, Inhofe and Co. are busy whining that they didn't get Gore's Senate testimony earlier. True statesmen. It looks like Lomborg's testimony has been delayed so long that Gore will be in front of the Senate before Lomborg starts. You can guess whom I'm going to choose to watch.

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Edwards, Canada, and now South Africa

Former Senator John Edwards (D-N.C.) -- now a presidential hopeful -- has just published his latest energy plan. One important plank of that plan foresees the nation producing (not just consuming, which would allow for imports) 65 billion gallons a year of ethanol by 2025. ("I'll meet your bid for 2030, Barack, and raise it by five billion!") If the 51 cents a gallon volumetric ethanol excise tax credit (VEETC) is extended beyond the end of 2010 -- as most commentators and even the USDA expect will happen -- here's what the cumulative cost to the U.S. Treasury would be …

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Major technological advances are necessary

Whatever you may think of Robert Samuelson, his essential point in today's Washington Post is sound: With developing countries increasing their energy use dramatically over the next few decades, the solution to climate change will have to come from major advances in technology. Put another way, given energy demand projections, we could not decrease the likelihood of climate change with existing technologies, as some environmentalists claim; they are simply too expensive, and carbon sequestration technology is in its infancy. This poses serious challenges, since technologies, once they are established, can become locked-in and hard to alter. This is not meant …

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All ten of ‘em

If you don't want to read my whole blow-by-blow of Gore's testimony to the House, here's a summary of his ten legislative recommendations. An immediate "carbon freeze" that would cap U.S. CO2 emissions at current levels, followed by a program to generate 90% reductions by 2050. Start a long-term tax shift to reduce payroll taxes and increase taxes on CO2 emissions. Put aside a portion of carbon tax revenues to help low-income people make the transition. Create a strong international treaty by working toward "de facto compliance with Kyoto" and moving up the start date for Kyoto's successor from 2012 …

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It’s popular even in Texas

I take issue with one-issue voters, mostly because I think one-issue candidates make terrible legislators. But that said, I wouldn't do what I do if didn't believe that transitioning to a renewable energy economy is a critical, keystone challenge facing our country, with profound implications for our future. And I'm not the only one. I don't think politicians properly appreciate how popular renewable energy is. Take this recent poll (PDF) from Texas, the heart of oil country. Eighty-four percent of Texans said they want the state to invest in solar -- that's broad support. And 81 percent are willing to …

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We’ll Miss the Mall

From the campaign trail, John Edwards outlines big energy plans Today we learned something: there are other Democrats running for president besides Hillrack O'Clinton. Surprised? So were we! Seems a charming southerner, name of John Edwards, is on the campaign trail. And though he's just your run-of-the-mill white fella, the former North Carolina senator is advancing some intriguing eco-ideas. At a speech in Iowa yesterday, he laid out an energy platform that includes capping greenhouse-gas emissions starting in 2010 and cutting them 15 percent by 2020; eliminating $3 billion in subsidies to oil companies; selling the right to emit greenhouse …

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Everything’s Up To Date in Kansas City Power & Light

Sierra Club makes groundbreaking deal with Midwest utility If a groundbreaking deal between an electric company and the Sierra Club is any indication, we can all get along. Aww. The green group has agreed to quit a six-year campaign against a new Missouri coal plant being built by Kansas City Power & Light; in return, the utility will cut 6 million tons a year of carbon dioxide emissions, which is the amount the new plant will spew. To hold up its end of the deal, KCP&L will purchase hundreds of windmills, encourage energy efficiency, reduce overall CO2 emissions 20 percent …

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