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Cities

Street people: In San Francisco, humans reclaim the right-of-way [SLIDESHOW]

In the City by the Bay, when the weather is nice, people have taken to lounging, cycling, and otherwise making themselves right at home -- in the middle of the streets.

Climate Change

Hope and climate change: Reasons to remain optimistic

Crawl out of that fetal position: Maybe we can still do something about climate change. Here are a few things to be hopeful about.

Politics

Pew poll: Clean energy still popular among everyone except old conservatives

The oldest, most conservative Americans may get turned off by clean energy, but it still has solid support among the rest of the electorate -- making it a classic wedge issue.

Energy Policy

Building codes: Small rules that help homeowners save big on energy

Illinois is poised to adopt the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code. New building codes can make a big dent in carbon emissions, and save residents money.

Cities

Betsy MacLean: Community development as public health

Can sustainability make sense in the inner city? Sure -- if you talk about saving money instead of saving polar bears.

Food

Graft punk: Breaking the law to help urban trees bear fruit

The Guerrilla Grafters play Frankenstein with ornamental city trees by splicing branches that yield fruit for the common good. But not everyone's happy: Their pursuit of fruit isn't exactly legal.

Urban Agriculture

New Orleans school cultivates a generation of forward-thinking farmers

Nat Turner and the hardworking young crew behind Our School at Blair Grocery are bringing healthy soil and fresh food to the Lower Ninth Ward.

Green Living Tips

Ask Umbra: What should I do with my old bike helmet?

A reader is at a loss for how to toss her battered brain bucket. Umbra, as always, is outspoken.

Climate Change

Hot pursuit: Amateur naturalists help track the shifting seasons

As the world warms, natural systems are getting thrown out of whack. Flowers bloom earlier each spring and wildlife misses seasonal cues. Now, scientists want your help to figure out what happens next.