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Only 28 percent of Fox News climate segments are accurate

fox-news-protest.jpg
Rena Schild / Shutterstock

According to a Pew study released last year, 38 percent of U.S. adults watch cable news. So if you want to know why so many Americans deny or doubt the established science of climate change, the content they're receiving on cable news may well point the way.

According to a new study by the Union of Concerned Scientists, misinformation about climate science on cable news channels is pretty common. The study found that last year, 30 percent of CNN's climate-related segments were misleading, compared with 72 percent for Fox News and just 8 percent for MSNBC. The study methodology was quite strict: Segments that contained "any inaccurate or misleading representations of climate science" were classified as misleading.

In 2013, 14 Fox News segments referencing climate science were entirely accurate whil 36 continated misleading statements. In 2013, 121 MSNBC segments referencing climate sciene were entirely accurate while 11 contianed misleading statements.
In 2013, 14 Fox News segments referencing climate science were entirely accurate while 36 contained misleading statements. Meanwhile, 121 MSNBC segments referencing climate science were entirely accurate while 11 contained misleading statements.

By far the worst performer was Fox (this is hardly the first study to associate this channel with sowing reams of doubt about climate change). Notably, the UCS report found that "more than half" of the channel's misleading content was due to The Five, a program where the hosts regularly argue against climate science. For instance, Greg Gutfeld, one of the show's regular co-hosts, charged on Sept. 30 that "experts pondered hiding the news that the Earth hadn't ... warmed in 15 years, despite an increase in emissions. They concluded that the missing heat was trapped in the ocean. It's like blaming gas on the dog if the ocean was your dog." (To understand what is actually going on with the alleged global warming "pause," and why the deep oceans may well explain part of the story, click here.)

You can watch Gutfeld's comments here:

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Director Werner Herzog hates chickens but loves KFC

KFC-kentucky-fried-chicken-bucket-flickr
Soubhagya S Behera

Do chickens scare you? Does staring into their beady eyes smack of your own mortality? If so, congrats: You’ve just scored “Werner Herzog” in Buzzfeed’s “Which German director of Grizzly Man are YOU?!” quiz!

As Modern Farmer recently noted, the filmmaker is bizarrely vocal about his bilious fear of chickens -- unless they’re between his teeth. He intones in a 2012 video (which is AMAZING):

The enormity of their flat brain, the enormity of their stupidity is just overwhelming ... It’s very easy to hypnotize a chicken. They're very prone to hypnosis, and in one or two films, I’ve actually shown that.

It’s true -- the befuddling ending of Herzog’s 1977 film Stroszek includes hypnotized chickens dancing and playing the piano (more or less humane than factory farming? Discuss):

Read more: Food, Living

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Ohio cracks down on methane pollution from fracking

Criminalize fracking
Bill Baker
This guy probably understands that Ohio's new rules don't go far enough.

Drillers in the heavily fracked Buckeye State will now have to do more to find and fix leaks in their systems, part of the latest initiative to crack down on climate-changing methane pollution. The Akron Beacon Journal reports:

Ohio on Friday tightened its rules on air emissions from natural gas-oil drilling at horizontal wells. ...

Drilling companies now are required to perform regular inspections to pinpoint any equipment leaks and seal them quickly.

Such leaks can contribute to air pollution with unhealthy ozone, add to global warming and represent lost or wasted energy. Fugitive emissions can account for 1 to 8 percent of methane from an individual well, according to some studies. ...

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Designed for lone commuters, this three-wheeled car gets 84 mpg

elio-three-wheeled-car

Glancing around at nearly empty cars on the freeway, it’s sadly clear that almost 80 percent of commuters drive to and from work alone. Public transit, biking, and carpooling are both much greener, obvi, but in lieu of those, a tiny, fuel-efficient car for one would be a wee step forward.

With its 84 mpg on the highway (49 mpg in the city) fuel efficiency, The Elio can go 672 freeway miles on a full tank. It’s technically not a car without a fourth wheel, but the mini pod will still get you to the office -- at up to 100 mph if you’re REALLY late. Its price tag is equally bite-size: $6,800.

elio-rear-view

If this “tiny, three-wheeled car!!!!” thing sounds familiar, it’s because others have tried but made itty-bitty death traps Americans understandably had no interest in buying. With its professed commitment to safety and more than 13,000 people in line, the Elio sounds promisingly different, but former Grister Tyler Falk is wary:

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This project has rescued more than 800 endangered baby penguins in six months

rescued-african-penguin-chick
Francis Louw/Britson Zoo Gardens & The Wild Place Project

The Chick Bolstering Project sounds like a GoldieBlox-style girl-empowerment trip, but it actually rescues endangered baby penguins -- no Beastie Boys lawsuit necessary!

The project is a partnership with the Southern African Foundation for the Conservation of Coastal Birds, the South African government, and others. In the past six months, they’ve rescued more than 800 endangered African penguin chicks from starvation. Does that mean it's time for a cuddle party?!

baby-penguin-chick-cared-for
Francis Louw/Britson Zoo Gardens & The Wild Place Project

That’s aww-worthy AND a big deal because African penguins are dying off like gangbusters. In the past 80 years, their population has shrunk 97.5 percent, because overfishing has eliminated their food and unusually cold weather puts ’em on ice. (Climate change, you buttface!)

In this most recent case, parent African penguins were abandoning their little ones because the babies were too small or sick. The Chick Bolstering Project hand-rears the chicks, helps them bulk up a little, and releases them three months later. Whether staffers actually chant, “Go! Have wild unprotected sex to further your species!” into the wind is anyone’s guess.

Read more: Living

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In the battle against proposed coal terminals, you are kicking ass

beating coal
Shutterstock

Companies that want to build hulking coal export terminals in Washington state have put out an industrywide mayday after a string of similar proposed projects were defeated amid fierce local opposition from activists and neighbors.

Opponents of such projects are worried about climate change and local air pollution and congestion. And now the terminal developers are worried that they are staring down complete and utter defeat. The Missoulian reports on a delightful tidbit from an energy conference last week:

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Pedestrians used to be America’s sports stars — complete with endorsements and doping scandals

pedestrianism-by-matthew-algeo-competitive-walking-cr.jpgRather than wearing skintight pants and jogging around a silly diamond, athletes in the 1870s would walk hundreds of miles as a nail-biting, bet-placing American public looked on. That’s right: Pedestrians were the original sports heroes.

That’s the subject of the new book Pedestrianism: When Watching People Walk Was America's Favorite Spectator Sport. Author Matthew Algeo dishes about how athletes would walk 500 miles’ worth of loops around what’s now Madison Square Garden, only stopping on Sundays. A cheering crowd would bet on who’d drop out or hit 100 miles first.

Gizmodo’s Alissa Walker has the dirt:

Pedestrianism had celebrity athletes and lucrative sponsorship agreements -- this is where corporate sponsorship began! -- and even doping scandals. Athletes got high on coca leaves and champagne, just like today.

Read more: Living

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Not so fast

States try to block cities’ transit plans

bus rapid transit sketch
Will Tennessee's Republican-controlled state legislature kill this proposed bus rapid transit line in Nashville?

As more cities come to terms with Americans’ shifting desires to get out of cars and onto mass transit, we are beginning to see bus and rail projects in some unexpected places. Mass transit isn’t just for your Europhile socialist coastal enclaves anymore. Cities in the Midwest and the Sun Belt are trying to develop well-planned transit systems such as light rail and bus rapid transit.

But there is a hitch: States tend to control both how transportation funds are raised and how they are spent. Even federal transportation dollars are mostly disbursed to states rather than localities. Many states, even liberal California and transit-rich New York, prohibit cities from levying most kinds of taxes without state permission, making it hard for metropolitan areas to raise funds for their own projects.

And, you’ll be shocked to discover, Republican state legislatures aren’t so keen on mass transit. In Indiana, for example, the counties in the Indianapolis region need state approval just to hold a referendum on whether to fund mass transit projects. And the state legislature would not give them that permission unless they dropped a light rail system from the proposal, and also dropped a corporate tax to pay for it.

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The big leafy

What “kalegate” taught us about New Orleans and food

kale
Shutterstock

It started with an off-hand snub in a New York Times travel story about New Orleans, and how minor celebrities like Solange Knowles (Beyonce’s younger sister) and the guy from the band Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeroes are moving to the city. Halfway through the story, Dutch actress Tara Elders down-talked the availability of produce in the city. “New Orleans is not cosmopolitan,” she said. “There’s no kale here.”

Turns out, you can insult New Orleans about its inability to do anything on time, or its culture of indulgence, but if you talk bad about its greens, the locals get up in arms.

Read more: Cities, Food

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Ask Umbra: Good gracious, is there lead in my fine china?

retro-vintage-porcelain-flatware-secret-2-cropped
Shutterstock

Send your question to Umbra!

Q. My mom passed along the set of dishes that my grandmother hand-carried home from China, back when she and my grandfather were among the very first U.S. tourists to travel there in the early ’70s. And they're beautiful, with colorful glazed patterns. The trouble is, the glazes all contain lead. (I checked.) I'd rather not just dump them as household hazardous waste, but I certainly don't want to give them away to someone who might unknowingly use them for food. Any suggestions? I'm not about to take up pique assiette myself, but I suppose I could find someone who does it.

Diana F.
Portland, Ore.

A. Dearest Diana,

We’ve all heard the saying about gift horses and mouths. In your case, I’d like to propose an addendum: “Unless that horse is china set that could be coated in lead.” You were wise to check into the safety of your inherited dinnerware, and you’re right to be concerned -- but I don’t think you necessarily have to kick your lovely heirlooms out of the house.

Read more: Food, Living