Food

Food

Canola gone wild! Uh-oh, transgenic plants are escaping and interbreeding

Scientists have found novel strains of canola, genetically modified to resist multiple pesticides, that are growing wild along North Dakota roads.

Business & Technology

The climate clock ticks faster, a solar campus, butter as biofuel, and 7 more green tales

Ten stories you might have missed from the greenosphere.

Food

Southern fig cake and old-fashioned fig preserves

Eating fresh figs is so sensual that it practically makes me blush. But if you're lucky enough to have a glut of these beauties, here are some recipes to preserve them for savoring later.

Food Feeding the City

Urban farms around America are breaking through concrete and hitting sustainable paydirt [SLIDESHOW]

From mid-May through July, Grist readers followed along as the Breaking through Concrete guys hit the highway to visit a couple dozen urban farms across America. Here, they sum up their trip and share some of Michael Hanson's most indelible …

Food

School lunch reform act creeps toward passage

The "Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act" has passed the Senate. But time is running out.

Food Feeding the City

Smart city governments grow produce for the people

Civic-minded local government officials from Baltimore, Md., to Bainbridge Island, Wash. are ripping out camellias and planting chard that's free for the taking instead, reports Public Produce author Darrin Nordahl. Dig into the next installment of our ongoing series on …

Food

Why did Whole Foods tart up my organic peanut butter?

In which I buy a jar of organic peanut butter from Whole Foods, find that it has added fat and sugar -- just like Jif! -- and am filled with righteous indignation.

Food

The time it always rained

For farmers, water is both boon and bane. Here in Nebraska, we've already gotten more rain than we usually get for the entire year, and more is on the way.

Business & Technology

Farmers markets growing like weeds around country

The USDA announced that there are now 6,132 farmers markets in the country, up a stunning 214 percent since 2000. But direct sales still represent just a tiny drop in the U.S. food bucket.