Skip to content Skip to site navigation

Food

Comments

Welcome Back, Kosher

Popularity of "eco-kosher" diet growing in U.S. Eco-food awareness has undeniably seeped into the mainstream, and religious communities are no exception. More and more, a low-impact diet is seen not just as a matter of health or ethics, but as a spiritual obligation. As evidence, look no further than the quickly growing "eco-kosher" movement; its followers seek nourishment that not only adheres to traditional Jewish dietary laws, but is also local, organic, sustainable, and humane. Eager to make eco-kosher eating as easy as possible, a group of Conservative Jews is drawing up a label for packaged kosher foods to let …

Read more: Food

Comments

Who Needs Aspirin?

Study finds organic tomatoes contain more heart-healthy antioxidants Could organic fruits and veggies be better for you? A study of samples collected over 10 years found that organic tomatoes contained far higher levels of flavonoids -- antioxidants that reduce high blood pressure and have also been linked with reduced rates of some cancers and dementia -- than conventional varieties. Researchers from the University of California-Davis say the boost may be related to nitrogen levels in soil, which are affected by the use of fertilizer. However, they hasten to point out that there are plenty of variables in this still-growing field: …

Read more: Food

Comments

Mind your (fo)odometer

Check out a new video on food miles from The Nation: You can also check out the accompanying article here.

Comments

Edible Media: Gene blues

Why we may one day bitterly regret GM crops

Edible Media takes an occasional look at interesting or deplorable food journalism on the web. I spent the weekend in Atlanta at the first-ever U.S. Social Forum -- an extremely interesting event, but not the place to go for someone needing to catch up on rest. Now I'm laid up with a sore throat, which gave me a chance to do today something I never get to do anymore -- curl up with the print version of the Sunday New York Times. I especially like to dig into the business section, where the "paper of record" often deposits its most …

Read more: Food

Comments

Putting the Source Before the Cart

Regional grocery chains seek "organic retailer" certification In some mainstream grocery stores, organic options are shunted to the side, put in a sort of "Food for Freaks" section where only the bravest shoppers dare to tread. But increasingly, regional chains are getting certified as "organic retailers" and even -- gasp -- shelving organic food next to other edibles. Ohio-based Kroger, Minnesota-based Lunds, and Maine-based Hannaford Bros. have earned a government-backed seal of o-pproval; with organic food sales soaring from $6 billion in 2000 to $14 billion in 2005, such stores are eager to get in on the action. Certification requires …

Comments

Wild Thing, You Make My Heart Sink

Wilderness is pretty much a thing of the past, says report Regardless of whether humankind was given dominion over the earth, we've most certainly taken it. A new report in Science calculates that only 17 percent of global land mass has been untainted by human dwellings, agriculture, or roads. And that was as of 1995; we'd venture to guess that the percentage is even more depressing now. Speaking of depressing: Half of the planet's land surface is used for crops or grazing, says the report, and nearly six times as much water is artificially stored by dams in the world …

Read more: Food

Comments

We Always Thought It Was Industrial Strength

McDonald's to power U.K. delivery fleet with its own grease Proving once again that everything's cooler in Europe, McDonald's has announced that it will run all its U.K. delivery vehicles on biodiesel -- from its own greasy grills! The chain will convert the 155-lorry fleet to a mix of 85 percent fry grease and 15 percent rapeseed oil by next year, and says the switch will cut its U.K. carbon emissions 75 percent. Mickey D's has already made a similar move in Austria, and is apparently drumming up other plans around packaging and recycling. All this comes on the heels …

Comments

Mongabay highlights for June '07

Some good news and some bad news

First up is an interview with Jack Ewing, owner of an eco-lodge in Costa Rica. I must admit that writing checks to conservation organizations is about as pleasurable as a trip to the dentist. Spending a week in a place like Hacienda Barú also supports conservation and is a hell of a lot more fun. I managed to photograph about half of the wildlife I saw while staying less than a week in Costa Rica. Best vacation I've ever had. I might put the video (much more interesting than photos) on YouTube one of these days. After reading that upbeat …

Read more: Climate & Energy, Food

Comments

A guide to grilling without red meat

As July 4th approaches, it's time to prepare for picnics and BBQs -- and, if you're eating less and less red meat these days, you're probably devising alternative strategies for these occasions. There are two main approaches to dealing with this situation: substituting other foods in place of red meat, or bumping dishes that used to be considered "sides" up to Main Attraction status and adding protein to them. I like to do a little bit of both. Where's the beef? Who cares? I realized several years ago that, while I really like all the "trimmings" on a burger, I …

Read more: Food, Living

Comments

Gourmet mag goes Maverick

My farm hits the newstands

It's startling to see an article in Gourmet -- the "magazine of good living" -- end with a man groping for a bag of potato chips. It's even more startling when that man is you. That's the precise position I found myself in a few days ago, when the July issue of Gourmet (unavailable online) arrived. In it, Elizabeth Royte -- author of Garbage Land and probably one of the best non-fiction writers working in the U.S. -- trains her reportorial skill on Maverick Farms, the small farm project I helped launch in spring 2004 on land owned by my …

Read more: Food, Living