Skip to content Skip to site navigation

Food

Comments

Consumers Say They’ll Stick With Coke

Organic milk to flood U.S. market, Stonyfield yogurt hits Europe Batten down the hatches: organic milk is about to flood the U.S. A combination of consumer demand and changing practices -- a ruling last year required organic dairy farmers to switch to feeding moo-cows 100 percent organic grain instead of 80 percent organic grain -- means a "wall of milk" will hit during the second half of this year, says Gregg Engles, CEO of mega-processor Dean Foods, which owns Horizon Organic. The industry expects a 40 percent increase in organic milk supply, creating a surplus of about 25 million gallons. …

Read more: Food

Comments

Metrofarming in the NYT

Coming to a city near you?

The New York Times ran a story this week on a grassroots effort that aims to demonstrate the potential for growing food in our cities. NY Sun Works' Center for Sustainable Engineering has a sustainable energy and hydroponics project floating on a barge in the Hudson River, and it's causing a minor buzz ... Their goal is to get Big Apple rooftops under full production: they claim there is enough rooftop space in the five boroughs to grow vegetables for the entire city of New York. Vegetables are only part of the picture of feeding all those folks, of course, …

Read more: Cities, Food, Living

Comments

Speaking of fake 'butter' and industrial corn ...

Orville Redenbacher must be stopped

My latest Victual Reality column looks at how perfectly wonderful foods like corn and butter get twisted up by food-industry marketers and flavor engineers, confusing people and often sending them scurrying in search of dubious, unhealthy, artificial substitutes -- which the food industry is only too willing to provide. As if on cue, out comes a New York Times piece on the horrors of microwave popcorn. Those unpleasant fumes that cloud the office when one of your co-workers pops a bag of Orville Redenbacher into the microwave? They really are noxious. (Thanks to reader Erica Stephan for alerting us to …

Read more: Food, Living

Comments

On the peculiar American habit of demonizing food

Not long ago, a reader wrote in with an interesting response to one of my many articles condemning industrially grown corn. Yes, you can buy it! Photo: iStockphoto "When sweet corn appears at the farmers' market next summer, can I buy it in good conscience?" she wanted to know. "Or is it bad for me and bad for the land?" I can see why she might be confused. Even as U.S. farmers prepare for what will almost certainly be the largest concentrated corn harvest in world history, criticism has rained down like fertilizer on an Iowa corn patch. Michael Pollan …

Read more: Food

Comments

Vegan couple make terrible mistake

Educate yourself before going vegan

From the Associated Press: A vegan couple were sentenced Wednesday to life in prison for the death of their malnourished 6-week-old baby boy, who was fed a diet largely consisting of soy milk and apple juice. I realize this is an extreme example, and these two were way out of the norm in their ignorance about vegan nutrition. I am not posting this to slam vegans. I'm just using it as an opportunity to give some unsolicited advice to any of you with children who are planning to go vegan: educate yourself thoroughly beforehand. Talk and listen to experienced, knowledgeable …

Read more: Food, Living

Comments

Feed Your Head

Alice Waters leads 200-chef brigade to protect wild salmon Led by celebri-chef Alice Waters, some 200 chefs in 33 states are calling on Congress to protect river habitats and deprioritize hydroelectric dams that cramp Northwest salmon's style. "Wild salmon is one of the unique, authentic heritage foods of the Pacific Northwest," reads a letter that the cooking coalition presented to legislators yesterday. "It represents perhaps our country's last great wild meal." The "Vote With Your Fork" campaign hopes to focus attention -- both public and congressional -- on the controversial dams that have gummed up the Northwest's Klamath and Snake …

Read more: Food

Comments

Just because it’s awesome

Occasionally I like to revisit one of the greatest magazine feature leads ever written: Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants. That, more or less, is the short answer to the supposedly incredibly complicated and confusing question of what we humans should eat in order to be maximally healthy. Perfect.

Read more: Food, Living

Comments

Poison the people? Everyone's doing it

Canada may raise pesticide levels to match U.S.

Every day there are roughly 1,347 stories I wish we could cover in Daily Grist. Here's one that didn't make the cut today, but that I can't get out of my head: in an effort to bring its rules in line with the U.S., Canada is getting ready to raise allowable levels of pesticides on food. Canadian authorities say it's just an effort to smooth out trade relations, and will be decided on a case-by-case basis. But critics say Canada and the U.S. already use more pesticides than Europe, making the new plan lu-di-crous. "We should look to equal or …

Read more: Food

Comments

One Bad Scrapple Spoils the Bunch

Regulators reveal new information on China-U.S. food links The tangled food relationship between China and the U.S. keeps getting tangledier. As new details emerge in the wake of the March wave of pet deaths, concerns about the possibility of tainted food reaching U.S. dinner tables are growing. U.S. regulators said yesterday that cyanuric acid, a chemical used as a stabilizer in swimming pools, was added to pet food, and that some doctored wheat flour used in the pet food was fed to fish raised for human consumption. Meanwhile, the USDA is considering approving sales of chicken from China, a prospect …

Read more: Food

Comments

Cutting the purse (seine) strings

Senators call for a worldwide end to fishing subsidies

The only thing worse than overfishing our oceans and driving species to the brink of extinction is the government paying to do it. That's been the case for far too long, as upwards of $30 billion (that's billion, with a "b") worth of subsidies are handed over to the fishing industry every year. A whopping $20 billion of that is used for things like boat repairs, fishing equipment, and fuel -- expenses that allow for increased and intensified fishing practices. This soon could be a thing of the past, now that 13 Senators from across the political spectrum introduced a …

Read more: Food