Skip to content Skip to site navigation

Green Home

Comments

Levitating LED light bulb could easily be the coolest thing in your house

Photo by Chris Rieger.

The internet is full of makers, creating homebrewed technology out of stuff they have lying around, but every so often someone makes a thing that I can totally see as the centerpiece of tomorrow's science-fiction way of life. For instance, this levitating LED bulb.

Read more: Cleantech, Green Home

Comments

Amazing tiny apartment has a bathtub under the dining table

This Barcelona flat might be our favorite tiny apartment yet. Everything is just so cleverly tucked away! The dressers are inside their own drawers that slide out from under the raised bed. The table and the bench slide back and forth on the wall, so they can be pulled apart for use or stacked for a smaller footprint. And the piece de resistance: Underneath the bench is a full-size bathtub.

Comments

Life-size LEGO garden sprouts up in Australia

In the Age of the Anthropocene, nature is what humans make it. LEGO took this idea quite literally when it graced the Australian town of Broken Hill, in New South Wales, with these giant versions of LEGO flowers and trees.

Read more: Green Home

Comments

These amazing lamps are made of salt

If Daniel McDonald's Shio lamps didn't cost $475 and up, they could do double duty seasoning your food or attracting deer. At this price point, you probably want to preserve them, unless you're Tony Stark or something -- but the point is, the lamps are made of salt crystals, grown on a fabric base like stalagmites in a cave.

Read more: Green Home, Living

Comments

It’s even in gum!: Tips on avoiding plastic from expert Beth Terry

When Beth Terry saw a photo of an albatross with a rib cage full of trash, she decided to give up plastic. Today, Terry might just be the world's foremost expert on how to live without the stuff. And that's no easy task. Think about all the nooks and crannies of our lives that plastic has made its way into: food packaging, clothing, the protective box your favorite gadgets come in, even facial scrubs. And while there are all kinds of reasons to hate plastic, for Beth Terry, it's an issue of justice. "The more I learn about plastic, the more I realize that it's those most vulnerable on the planet -- whether it's animals or babies or poor people -- who are affected the most," she says.

Terry’s new book Plastic Free: How I Kicked the Plastic Habit and How You Can Too is published without plastic, all the way down to the glue. (If you're going to shop for it online, check out her website first to learn about buying from a place that has committed to shipping it without plastic.) We talked with Terry recently about plastic-free living, why the proposed alternatives to bisphenol A (BPA) might be worse, and the connection between cutting out plastic and building a local economy.

Read more: Food, Green Home

Comments

Tulsa authorities bulldoze edible garden for being too tall

Denise Morrison grew more than 100 types of plants in her yard in Tulsa, Okla. She had garlic chives and strawberry, apple mint and spear mint, an apple tree and a pecan tree.

But someone complained about it, and city inspectors stopped by. Her plants, they said, were too tall. The entire lawn would have to go.

Morrison knew she was in the right; she had read the city code, which allowed plants over 12 inches if they were meant for human consumption. Hers were, so she got the police involved. They issued a citation, and she and the city went before a judge in August. The judge told them to come back in October.

The next day, the city came to Morrison's yard and bulldozed her plants.

Read more: Cities, Green Home, Living

Comments

This dude bought a private island in New York City for less than a studio apartment

Alex Schibli, 72, owns an island, right smack off the coast of Manhattan. (Delightfully, it’s called “Rat Island.” Great name for a NYC island, or BEST name?) When you hear “owns an island” you figure “Romney rich,” but Schibli only paid $176,000 for the 2.6 acres. That might seem like a lot, but when a studio apartment in the East Village is going for $400,000, really, it's a steal. Schibli told the New York Post why he chose to buy a little piece of nature:

I’d always dreamed of having my own place for peace and quiet in the middle of the ocean. When Rat Island came on the market, I had to buy it ...

I love swimming, canoeing and collecting mussels -- and we’re going to have lots of fun with my family. There’ll be picnics, barbecues and the occasional party, but, more than anything, we’re just going to relax.

Read more: Cities, Green Home, Living

Comments

The coolest tiny home we’ve seen recently has a giant hole in the roof

The key to small-space living is not feeling cramped, which makes this Barcelona apartment the pinnacle of the genre. The home uses sliding doors to open the 430-square-foot apartment up for a sense of space, or close it for privacy. But the centerpiece of the house is the hole in the ceiling -- a plant-filled half-outdoor shower that's built like a chimney, open to the sky. (Don't worry -- there are camouflaging plants on top, so the drones will have to work VERY hard to see you naked.)

Read more: Cities, Green Home

Comments

Tile your home with recycled money

Pennies are so useless as legal tender that there's genuine debate about whether we should even keep them around. It wastes energy and resources to produce them, they're disproportionately costly to make (1.7 cents per one-cent coin!), and there's not a vending machine on Earth that will take them. A lot of people reportedly just throw them away. But they're still minting the little suckers, for now, so you might as well make them justify their expensive existence. Which means you could dump them in the Coinstar machine ... or you could use them to make an awesome, cost-effective copper flooring that is, excuse me, really money.

Read more: Green Home, Living

Comments

16-square-foot apartment is a vision of tiny housing taken too far

We love tiny housing -- it's less wasteful, and so adorable! But there's a limit to how small a space you can live in and still not go insane. We butted up against it with the 78-square-foot apartment, but this video about a (fictional, but plausible) Hong Kong apartment called King's Cube plunges past the way-too-tiny event horizon. The room in the video is 16 square feet, just big enough for a smallish bed.

Read more: Cities, Green Home