Infrastructure

Biking

One mile on a bike is a $.42 economic gain to society, one mile driving is a $.20 loss

Copenhagen, the bicycle-friendliest place on the planet, publishes a biannual Bicycle Account, and buried in its pages is a rather astonishing fact.

Transportation

Aging boomers who can’t drive will be trapped in unwalkable cities of their own making

Judging by how pedestrian-unfriendly the average American city has become, all our aging parents apparently enjoy being prisoners in their own homes.

Cities

Wooden skyscrapers are like log cabins on steroids

When most folks think “wooden building,” they conjure up images of rustic log cabins or ye olde fashioned outhouses. Architect Michael Green wants to whittle something decidedly more modern out of wood: skyscrapers.

Infrastructure

Off-ramp: How demolishing freeways is reviving American cities

Former Milwaukee Mayor John Norquist talks about why it makes economic sense to tear out urban expressways, and why a little gridlock might actually be a good thing.

Cities

New York has a subway system just for garbage

New York’s Roosevelt Island is like Futurama for trash: Underneath the island, a system of pneumatic tubes whisks garbage from trash and recycling bins off to the processing center. Now the company that built the tubes, Envac, wants to expand to more of the city.

Energy Policy

Meet the worst Senate amendment that ever lived

A new amendment to the Senate transportation bill greenlights the Keystone XL pipeline and drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, among other Big Oil monstrosities.

Cities

Goodbye-ways: The downfall of urban freeways

A new report calls urban highways “a failed experiment,” and suggests that cities have much to gain from trading in blacktop for parks and new development.

Nuclear

5 stories about the Fukushima anniversary that you really need to read

This weekend marked the one-year anniversary of Japan’s earthquake, tsunami, and subsequent nuclear accident. While thousands of residents fell victim to the natural disasters, countless others are still living in fear of radiation poisoning from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant’s triple meltdown. There’s a cornucopia of news in light of the March 11 anniversary, but lucky for you, we’ve broken it down into digestible morsels. Here are five stories about the Fukushima anniversary that are not to be missed:

Solar Power

Rooftop revolution: How to get solar to 100 million Americans

Nearly 100 million Americans could install over 60,000 megawatts of solar at less than grid prices – without subsidies – by 2021. That's the takeaway from a new report by John Farrell of the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.

Got 2.7 seconds?

We've devised the world's shortest survey to find out what kind of actions our readers are taking. You know you want to.

×