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Grist List: Look what we found.


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Climate change could give you rabies

Photo by Michael Hemstra

If rabid environmental activists don't get their way, the rest of us might end up rabid too. This year's drought is leading to a huge jump in rabies rates in stricken states, and climate change will only make it worse.

Read more: Climate Change

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Oh my god, hot-dog-stuffed-crust pizza, humans are no longer authorized to make food

Although my job obviously requires me to intermittently make fun of McDonald's, in my real life I actually try not to be elitist and judgmental about the food people choose to eat. However, I think this may have crossed my line. WHAT IS WRONG WITH ALL OF YOU WHY IS YOUR PIZZA CRUST HOT DOGS WHY IS YOUR SANDWICH BREAD FRIED CHICKEN WHY CAN'T YOU BE SATISFIED TO EAT ONE FOOD AT A TIME

Read more: Scary Food

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New film about fracking stars Matt Damon, John Krasinski, and maybe you

Ryan Gosling may have saved a woman from a speeding car, but some of our other favorite stars are doing the next best thing: starring in an anti-fracking movie. Gus Van Sant is directing, and the cast includes Matt Damon, John Krasinski, Frances McDormand, probably Hal Holbrook -- and, if you can get to Pittsburgh this weekend, maybe you.

Read more: Living, Natural Gas

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Congressman brags about forcing vegetarians to ‘confess’

Nobody expects the Carnivore Inquisition. Their chief weapons are surprise, fear, misuse of House testimony, and being a giant jackass named Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa).

King bragged at a recent town hall meeting that he'd grilled witnesses before the House Agriculture Committee on their dietary habits, forcing them to "confess" that they were vegetarians.

Read more: Food, Politics

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Presenting the largest rooftop farm … in the world!!!

In Brooklyn yesterday, BrightFarms announced that it would be building the largest rooftop farm … in the world!!!

The New York-based company builds hydroponic greenhouse farms that are connected to supermarkets. The idea is to minimize transportation costs and time in the food system, delivering very local and very fresh food.

The new farm is going on 100,000 square feet of rooftop in Sunset Park. It will grow up to 1 million pounds of veggies like tomatoes, lettuces, and herbs each year, with the first harvest planned for next spring. The system also will capture storm water, diverting it from New York's overtaxed sewer system.

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Critical List: The return of the loan-guarantee program; Texas least prepared for climate change

The Energy Department is reviving its loan program. (AAAH! SOLYNDRA! AAAAAAAH!…say Republicans. We're pretty sure this will all work out fine.)

Environmental groups want final rules governing coal ash and are suing the EPA to get them.

Texas: not very prepared for climate change. California: doing better than everyone else, at least.

In China, drought means that 7.8 million people and almost 10 million acres of farmland lack adequate drinking water.

Read more: Uncategorized

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How the new NYC taxi is bike-friendly

New York City's new taxis have sliding doors, so that there's no danger that a tourist from the flyover zone will thoughtlessly door a passing cyclist when he or she hops out.

Read more: Uncategorized

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If everyone used as much energy as Americans, we’d run out of oil in 9 years

Unlike gluttonous American industry, Europe's most profitable companies plan to make even more money by getting ahead of this whole peak oil trend, reports Der Spiegel. And it’s a damn good thing, because if everybody guzzled oil like Americans, we’d be even more screwed than we are now.

Case in point:

If every person on Earth used as much energy as the average person in the United States, today's known oil reserves would be exhausted within nine years.

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Google saves energy by cooling its buildings with ice

Google's new $700 million data centers in Taiwan will make ice at night, when electricity is significantly cheaper, and use it to cool the buildings during the day, reports Rich Miller at Data Center Knowledge. It's called thermal storage, and it's basically a battery, but for air conditioning.