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Grist List: Look what we found.


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Did NYPD falsify account of cyclist’s death?

In October of 2011, a truck hit and killed artist Mathieu Lefevre while he was biking in Brooklyn. Since then, Lefevre's family and their lawyers have been trying to find out what exactly happened that night. The NYPD's investigation includes descriptions of surveillance footage showing Lefevre trying to pass a truck on the right. But now Lefevre's family and lawyers have seen the tapes the NYPD used to draw these conclusions, and the footage doesn't quite match up with the NYPD's interpretation of it.

Read more: Biking, Cities

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Critical List: Connecting climate change to the Texas heat wave; ditching plastic straws

Climate scientist James Hansen says he can prove that climate change caused the Texas heat wave.

Maine fishermen caught more lobster last year than ever before.

Wave and tidal energy could provide enough electricity to meet 15 percent of current demand in the United States.

In London, plastic straws are the new plastic bags. No one wants 'em.

An Alaska congressman created a (joke! it was a joke!) resolution urging the federal government to take control of Central Park, analogizing that action to the federal government's relationship to the Alaska National Wildlife Refuge. Because Central Park is so pristine, and also has oil underneath it. They are exactly the same! Environmentalists now say, "Oh, we totally get it! Yah, let's drill in ANWR. And in Central Park, too, why not."

Read more: Uncategorized

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video

Kristen Bell loses her mind over a sloth

OK, real talk for a second? This is almost certainly how I would react if a sloth came to my birthday party:

Read more: Animals

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Russians could not be more psyched about ice-free Arctic

One psyched Russian. (Photo by Andrew Kitzmiller.)

You think the large-scale melting of Arctic ice is a bad thing? Well I guess you’ve never been Russia. The former empire is hoping to bring back its glory days by reviving a Soviet-era shipping route along its Arctic coast, reports the Montreal Gazette.

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Maine to create car-free town with ‘really narrow streets’

The Shambles of York. (Photo by Bev Sykes.)

Residents of the yet-to-be-built town of Piscataquis Village, Maine, will keep cars from overrunning their town by making their streets too narrow to shove any but the cutest vehicles down them, reports Market Urbanism.

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Invasive pythons have eaten literally everything in Everglades

In the Everglades, recent counts reveal that 88 percent of bobcats, 99 percent of raccoons and opossums, and effectively 100 percent of rabbits and foxes have simply disappeared from the park, reports the Washington Post.

Why? Because giant, invasive snakes ate them.

Read more: Animals

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House Republicans’ transportation bill contains zero good policy

House Republicans are going to unveil their transportation bill today, and it is expected to have a ton of backwards ideas in it. These include:

  • Spending more money on highways than anything else
  • Encouraging private companies to expand highways and charge for the use of those lanes
  • Funding highway work through oil and gas drilling revenues
Read more: Politics

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What corporate logos does a 5-year-old know?

This video, in which designer Adam Ladd's 5-year-old daughter rattles off corporate logos while sounding exactly like Marcel the Shell, is simultaneously adorable and sobering:

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Cacti can clean up poisonous soils

Here are a few things you do with a prickly pear cactus: Get poked. Turn its fruit into jam. Use it to clean up dangerous concentrations of selenium in arid California lands.

In California's San Joaquin Valley, a long history of artificial irrigation has impregnated the soil with selenium. In small quantities, selenium is beneficial to humans and animals -- essential, even. In larger quantities, it’s toxic.

Prickly pear cacti, though, can thrive in these soils, even though irrigation has also made the soil and water dangerously salty.

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Watch a rabbit herd sheep

Here's an adorable innovation for all you urban farmers out there: