Grist List

Living

New York kids need a doctor’s note to use sunscreen in school or at camp

Once upon an innocent American summer, sun-kissed cheeks were all the rage for lithe, beautiful children freckling in the clean air. But now we know that evil sun rays will kill you — not now, but later, with skin cancer — and that kids should wear sunscreen pretty much any time they go outside for more than five minutes. New York state, though, apparently still has one foot in the 1950s. State law requires that a kid bring in a doctor’s note in order to use sunscreen at school or at summer camps, the Democrat and Chronicle reports. Steve Hendrickson, …

Living

The coolest photos of Earth from space we’ve ever seen, hands down

NASA astronaut Don Pettit takes pictures from the International Space Station, and they are mind-boggling. In the long-exposure photos, cities appear as streaks of light as the ISS orbits Earth at Ludicrous Speed. And those blotches? Those are lightning. Holy shit.

Food

Here is that piano made of bananas you asked for

I’m not going to make a joke about “playing with your food.” I think we’re all above that. But you should all know that some MIT students have developed a bit of tech that will allow you to make your excess produce into a musical instrument. Actually, the MaKey MaKey is even cooler than that — I just wanted to pick an application that’s relevant to Grist, and I figured, food, right? But the truth is it can turn basically anything into a key (make key, get it?).

Cities

The 6 most awesome telephone pole signs

Smart humans lighten up their nabes with funny phone pole signs. Herewith, our favorites from the internet.

Oil

Fakey McFakerson: Mini oil rig causes massive booze spill at Shell execs’ party

IMPORTANT UPDATE: This smelled kinda like oil-soaked fish to us (and a lot of the internet), so I called Shell, and a spokesperson told me in no uncertain terms, “I can confirm that this was not a Shell event.” You may still want to watch the video, but view it as a delightful exercise in alternate-universe fantasy, where bad guys always get their comeuppance and the Yes Men (probably) dole out poetic justice to all. Original post preserved below, for transparency and also having some funny jokes in it.

Green Cars

Check out this 100-year-old electric car

Electric cars are a modern new technology, so modern and unproven that many [Republicans] would say they couldn’t possibly be plausible. Except for how they’ve actually been around since the turn of the 20th century. This photo of an electric car charging (above, click to embiggen) is from 1909, and by that point the technology was already 15 years old.

Business & Technology

Honda Fit, most efficient car EVER, gets 118 MPG equivalent

In England, when you want to say that a guy or a gal is h-o-t-t HOT, you say “He/she is FIT!” And that is what we want to say about the 2013 Honda Fit EV. The Fit is FIT. F-i-t-t FIT! This car — this car! — according to the EPA, gets the fuel efficiency equivalent if 118 miles per gallon. Wow. As an electric vehicle (EV), the car does not use fuel, so one might also say that it gets 29 kilowatt-hours per 100 miles. That’s better than the Ford Focus Electric, the Mitsubishi i-MiEV, and the Nissan Leaf, …

Cities

First-graders protest Starbucks to save local coffee shop

Back in 2011, a tragedy of epic proportions struck the East Village: Starbucks moved in. And not only did it move in, it kicked a beloved local coffee shop, The Bean, out of its flagship location. Even non-coffee drinking elementary school students were outraged, as Majorie Ingall discovered: Here we have a piece of paper recovered from the recesses of the backpack of an East Village, NYC elementary school student. Translation from first-grader-ese: Starbucks: The Bean Instead. These budding activists handed out their hand-drawn flyers to their schoolmates, plus some for the Bean staff. According to other local kids, they …

Animals

Horseshoe crabs have weird, bright blue blood

Horseshoe crabs have bright blue blood. They are like aliens. (Does this one not look like a dead alien?) Nature, you are weird. Robert Krulwich explains why the crabs’ blood is so beautifully blue: Their blood kind of sloshes around in their bodies carrying oxygen to various organs, as our blood does. Our blood is red because we use hemoglobin to move oxygen around. Hemoglobin has iron in it, which gives off a reddish hue. (Think of rust.) Horseshoe crabs use a copper-based molecule called hemocyanin to distribute oxygen. In nature, copper turns things blue or blue-green. So that’s why …

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