Grist List

Climate Change

Study: Even a small temperature increase will obliterate Greenland ice cap

If you’ve been enjoying the recent unseasonably warm weather, prepare for a buzzkill: A study published on Sunday by the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research found that even a teensy global temperature increase could turn the Greenland ice sheet into the world’s largest puddle. Previous research has suggested it would need warming of at least 3.1 degrees Celsius (5.6 degrees Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial levels, in a range of 1.9-5.1 C (3.4-9.1 F), to totally melt the icesheet. But new estimates, published in the journal Nature Climate Change, put the threshold at 1.6 C (2.9 F), in a range of …

Animals

Baby sloths pooping

The next installment in your continuing Grist List coverage of baby sloths being incomprehensibly adorable:

Climate Change

Nicaraguan military builds a battalion of climate-change-fighting soldiers

In Nicaragua, the military has a new mission — fighting climate change and, specifically, the illegal loggers that are exacerbating deforestation in the country. The Ecological Battalion’s 580 soldiers are currently engaging in Operation Green Gold, finding and intercepting loads of illegally logged timber.

Critical List: Japan marks Fukushima anniversary; politicians agree fracking causes earthquakes

Japan marked the one-year anniversary of the Fukushima disaster this weekend. The Americans who are paying the highest gas prices live in blue states, so everyone else quit yer bitchin’. Meet ten families who live right next a nuclear plant — and love it.

Animals

New species alert: Check out the Galapagos Catshark

Researchers recently announced a new species of shark, the Galapagos Catshark, or Bythaelurus giddingsi. Catsharks are one of the largest families of sharks, and are also known as dogfish, a synonym scenario that is not at all ass-backwards. And to make classification even more complex, the newly discovered species of catshark/dogfish has a lot in common with the snowflake: The arrangement of leopard-like spots on Galapagos Catshark is unique to each fish. So it’s a catshark or dogfish with spots like a leopard and the characteristics of a snowflake — got it?

Climate Change

New SimCity has SimClimateChange

SimCity is back (or will be in 2013), and looking pretty damn awesome. And now, along with public approval and municipal funds and Godzilla attacks, there’s a new factor to juggle: Making lousy energy choices can force your city to contend with climate change.

Climate & Energy

Philippines police to plant 10 million trees in one year

Police officers in the Philippines are trading their guns and billy clubs for weapons of mass construction: shovels, watering cans, and gardening gloves. That’s because they’re partnering with the country’s Department of Environmental and Natural Resources to combat climate change and deforestation. Their Green Ops mission? Plant 10 million treesin one year. The push to reforest the Philippines comes on the heels of a recent executive order by President Benigno Aquino, known as the National Greening Program, which aims to rehabilitate nearly 500 thousand acres of previously cleared forest cover by February 2013.

Business & Technology

Electric scooter version of Zipcar hits San Francisco

San Francisco's hipsters are about to get motorized: Scoot Networks rents scooters like Zipcar.

Living

Best light bulb ever will cost you $50

Remember the awesome LED that the government declared the greenest lightbulb ever? Well, you can buy it now. But you probably won’t. Because you like to do things like eat and pay rent. We knew this sucker was going to be expensive. The number that was floating around was $40, and green commentators near and far thought most consumers would have sticker shock at that price. Turn out, Phillips is selling the bulbs for $50. Fifty bucks! That is HALF OF A HUNDRED DOLLARS. I know — rationally — that the bulbs will last for 10,000 hours and will save …

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