Obviously, your beer bottle glass will have previously contained better beer than this.
Obviously, your beer bottle glass will have previously contained better beer than this.
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Business Insider may think that canned beer is better than glass-bottled beer. And we don’t disagree that canned beer has advantages: like Ska Brewing’s Dave Welz, we also often “want to have a beer at the summit of a hike.” (The way down is way easier if you roll.) But if you’re looking to figure out which is the more responsible consumption choice, it’s hard to tell — neither bottles nor cans are exactly good for the environment. One thing that is clear, though, is that people tend to recycle cans more readily: “About 45 percent of cans are recycled, compared with around 25 percent of bottles,” Slate says.

That’s pretty lame. Especially when it’s so easy to recycle glass beer bottles into permanent drinking vessels, a.k.a. glasses. There are only five steps. Plus, the process involves lighter fluid and fire. What could go wrong?

It sounds simple enough, and only a little likely to cause third-degree burns, and College ENVY, a website whose mission, apparently, is “redefining awesome,” even has pictures.

Basically, you tie a string around the fat part of a beer bottle, soak the string in lighter fluid, put the flammable string back on the bottle (held horizontally), and light the string on fire. In about 10 seconds, you should hear a crack, at which point you run that sucker under cold water. Bam! The top falls off. You’ve got a glass — now you just need to sand the edge.

We’d try this out ourselves, except, uh, we don’t keep lighter fluid around. But try it and let us know how it goes! Assuming you’ve still got internet after burning down your house.