Skip to content Skip to site navigation

Living

Comments

Browse the web like an eco-chic geek

The eco-revolution will not be televised. This time, it's on the web in the form of a sleek new web browser at Flock.com. If you want to keep tabs on the latest green scene while staying caught up on whatever your friends are doing, then the Flock Eco browser is all you need. Based on the Mozilla/Firefox setup, Flock allows you to be logged into all your social networks at once -- Facebook, Flickr, YouTube, Twitter, etc. -- while at the same time collecting your fave green media and RSS feeds in one place. Because Grist is partnering with Flock …

Read more: Living

Comments

Everyday choices depend more on culture, infrastructure, economics, and values

I see Maywa beat me to the "I really like Michael Pollan, but ... " post. I too was disappointed with Pollan's answer to the question of "Why Bother?" As in, why bother taking personal steps to reduce one's contribution to climate change? I will say this, though: the article did sharpen my thinking about why I think we should bother. One of the things I've always admired about Pollan's writing is his knack for delivering sly polemic that hangs equally on scientific arguments and common sense. It's a neat trick that makes simple acts like reading an ingredients label …

Read more: Climate & Energy, Living

Comments

Interactive poster from German designer

German designer Timm Kekeritz took the "virtual water" data that Sarah posted about from Waterfootprint.org and created this cool interactive poster. We featured Timm's work in the February issue of Seed (not online, but Treehugger wrote about it), which prompted me to order a giant paper version of the double-sided poster. With one side devoted to "footprints of nations" and the other side showing the water "inside" products, this enormous and graphically riveting wall-hanging makes a very cool, if intimidating, addition to any interior décor.

Read more: Living

Comments

Celebrate Earth Day by ditching annoying green clichés

I'm all about the three R's that have been the standby of every Earth Day since 1970: reduce, reuse, recycle. Got it. Even so, this Earth Day, I'm beseeching the world to do the unthinkable: stop recycling ... those annoying green clichés, that is. I think it's gee-golly-swell that environmental issues have started gaining such mainstream momentum recently, but if I read, see, or hear another overly trite use of "It is/is not easy being green!" or "An Inconvenient X," I think I'll start puking mini green recycling symbols. And enough already with the "Make every day Earth Day!" e-cards …

Read more: Living

Comments

Comments

Putting a bounty of paper towels to the test

Are your paper towels poisoning the planet? OK, I admit it: it's not the sexiest product to test. Hard as I tried to convince a recent pair of weekend houseguests to take part in my experiments, they left without touching a single sheet. But paper towels are an everyday item that can make a big impact -- not just on your countertops, but on the planet. (And hey, we can't all get the beer-tasting gig.) Conventional paper processing is intensive -- not only does the quest for virgin fiber lead to massive deforestation, but the manufacturing process typically involves chlorine, …

Read more: Living

Comments

Pollan envy

For people involved in the TV business, I imagine watching The Wire -- David Simon's novelistic depiction of big-city dysfunction on HBO -- generates mixed feelings. On one hand: Damn that's good. On the other: Damn. That's really good. It makes what once seemed excellent appear merely adequate; what was once adequate now worthless. It has transcended its medium and made those still laboring within its received limitations seem ... diminished. That's how I feel when I read essays by Michael Pollan. Take his cover piece in New York Times Magazine's current green issue: "Why Bother?" It is profound, but …

Read more: Climate & Energy, Living

Comments

The candidates are overlooking the ultimate green-collar job

Amid the din of the Pennsylvania primary and Earth Day, it seems a fitting time to talk about where the Democratic candidates stand when it comes to Mother Earth. Have the leading Dems forgotten America's greenest job? Photo: Freaking News Both candidates have called for ushering in a new green economy. Sen. Barack Obama has stressed that a green economy would not only save on energy costs but would help create jobs in manufacturing and in renewable energy infrastructure. And at a General Motors plant making parts for hybrids, Sen. Hillary Clinton declared that the factory "exemplifies" her notion of …

Read more: Food, Living, Politics

Comments

Walt Disney Co. gets into nature

The Walt Disney Company has announced a new film division that will focus on nature documentaries. The creatively named Disneynature will aim to produce two films every year starting in 2009, hoping to catch the interest of some of the viewers who flocked to Warner Bros.' March of the Penguins and the Discovery Channel/BBC series "Planet Earth." Keep your eyes out for the Disney-produced Earth in 2009, Oceans in 2010, and Chimpanzees in 2012, as well as features on flamingos, flowers, and big cats. Disney envisions the documentaries spinning off "beautiful books," DVDs, and theme-park attractions. Ah, the sweet smell …

Comments

Most Americans don’t believe global warming will pose a threat to them

A new series of Pew polls shows public concern for climate change is out of sync with the science:

Read more: Climate & Energy, Living