Skip to content Skip to site navigation

Living

Comments

Sundance launches TV’s first eco-centered primetime block

Your TV just got a little smarter. As Amanda mentioned last month, the Sundance Channel has launched "The Green," a weekly primetime destination that showcases original series and documentaries based on the earth's ecology and "green" concepts for living in better harmony with the planet. I'm personally excited about this project now that my favorite Seafood Contamination Campaign spokeswoman, Amber Valletta, has her very own spot. She joins the ranks of other thespians, athletes, and supermodels using their fame for the good of the environment. Check out this actress in action:

Read more: Living

Comments

From Grillz to Grime

You know the grill Purists that we are, we're so thankful that a carbon-neutral dental practice has opened in the U.K. Now we can fly across the pond to glam up our grillz, guilt-free! Photo: Corey McKrillClick to enlarge Strike a poser The Material Girl justified her love for Live Earth with a new single this week, just as LiveAid/8 organizer Bob Geldof got all jealous proved he's never met this guy. Said Geldof, "We are all (expletive) conscious of global warming." Papa, don't preach. Photo: George Chin / MLSNETImages.com The vice is wrong, bitch! Pollution from illegal alcohol plants …

Read more: Living

Comments

Comments

And I Am a Recycled-Material Girl

Madonna releases single to support Live Earth climate efforts What is it about climate change that makes music ... suck? First we had Melissa Etheridge's "I Need to Wake Up," the earnest, Oscar-winning Inconvenient Truth anthem. Now we have Madonna's "Hey You," a somnolent single released this week in conjunction with Live Earth, the continents-spanning climate-awareness concerts planned for 7/7/07. While we can't complain about our favorite virgin's intentions -- the single is downloadable for free for a week, and Microsoft is donating 25 cents for each of the first million downloads to the Alliance for Climate Protection -- we …

Read more: Climate & Energy, Living

Comments

The Beak In Review

West Nile virus hitting bird populations hard, says new study The West Nile virus soldiers on, declares a report published yesterday in Nature. Eight years after the virus left the West Nile and made its way to the U.S. Northeast, chickadee populations in the region have dropped 53 percent, while Eastern bluebird populations have been diminished by 44 percent. American crows have been hit the hardest, being wiped out entirely in some small regions. According to ecologist Carsten Rahbek, the trend "suggests that West Nile virus could potentially change the composition of bird communities across the entire continent" -- which, …

Read more: Living

Comments

Circle of Blue

Check out Circle of Blue, a new initiative to coordinate journalists and educators around the mission of injecting the freshwater crisis into mainstream dialogue. Modeshift has a long and informative introduction to the project.

Read more: Living

Comments

Network TV’s best show is cancelled

It's no secret that we have a Grist-wide crush on Kristen Bell (the world's sexiest vegetarian!). So I feel obliged to take a break from the green and note with great sorrow that CW has cancelled Veronica Mars, Bell's sharp, sassy, criminally underappreciated star vehicle. It's a cliche at this point that females are bombarded with unhealthy messages in pop culture, but it's true nonetheless. I'm honestly surprised women can stand to watch network TV. It's filled with idealized virgins and scheming whores, every one supermodel scrawny. More recently, with the attempt to present "real" women, we've gotten the likes …

Read more: Living

Comments

On slow food, communal eating, and Reubenesque sandwiches

This is the last in a series of articles about connecting with people over spring meals. Read others on setting up a dining co-op, celebrating Passover, hosting an Earth Dinner, and appreciating slow food. In my last column, I wrote about the slow-food movement, which unites people interested in flavors, food preservation, and, of course, eating. The movement is international in its scope and impact, but it is active on the local level; there are currently 140 Slow Food chapters in the U.S. Known as convivia, these groups often feature speakers or tastings -- or both. In Boston, for example, …

Read more: Food, Living

Comments

A great profile

Time magazine has a long, insightful, and sympathetic profile of Al Gore in the latest issue. The theme is "the last temptation of Gore," i.e., the temptation of running for president. But as the article makes clear, it's not that tempting, for all the reasons we've discussed here before. Anyway, read it -- it's extraordinarily good. Moving, even. They've also got an excerpt from Gore's new book, The Assault on Reason. I've got a copy on the way -- I'll report back once I've read the whole thing.

Read more: Living, Politics

Comments

Not On My Botch — Uh, Watch

Katrina refugees say FEMA trailers making them sick As states in the Southeastern U.S. brace for this year's hurricane season, new Federal Emergency Management Agency head David Paulison has a promise: "You won't see what happened with Katrina happen again in this country.'' Paulison assured a crowd of emergency responders in Florida that the "new FEMA" is on its toes. Which is good news, because the old FEMA is still housing 86,000 families in temporary trailers throughout the gulf region. And those trailers, say residents and observers, are giving off toxic fumes that are making people sick. According to the …

Read more: Climate & Energy, Living