My vegetarian girlfriend/camera operator refuses to watch this week’s video, so I won’t be insulted if you skip over it. I’ll be more impressed, though, if you watch. The slaughter is followed by a recipe for bison tartare. When you’ve seen the farm, and the butchering process, raw is a non-issue. For those of you who have the lust for blood, or like to see where your meat comes from, this is another one for you.

If you can call killing an animal humane, this is probably the most humane killing I’ve ever seen. The two bison were dead before they hit the ground — they never knew it was coming. Regardless, it’s hard to see an animal of such strength and beauty die and then get butchered.

Bison tartare

This recipe is different than most tartare recipes in that I like to put a lot of extra stuff in it. My food philosophy generally leans toward having the meat enhance rather than take center stage and I’ve done the same thing with this recipe.

1/2 lb. bison ribeye, tenderloin, sirloin, or any of the more tender cuts (with all sinew removed)
1 small bunch of kale (about a cup minced)
1/2 lemon
1 small daikon radish (small dice)
1/2 apple (small dice)
1 tablespoon minced sage
1/3 red onion (small dice)
2 tablespoons mustard seeds
1/4 cup vinegar (any flavor — I used sherry)
1/4 cup water
2 tablespoons honey
Salt to taste
1 egg yolk

Start by pickling the mustard seeds. Mix together vinegar, water, honey, and salt in a pan with the mustard seeds. Bring to a boil and simmer for 5-10 minutes. Chill in the refrigerator.

Marinate the minced kale in lemon juice. This helps to break down the tough texture and also provides a nice acidic punch to the dish.

Cut the bison into a small dice, similar in size to the vegetables. Add a liberal amount of salt and pepper. Add all of the remaining ingredients and mix together. Taste for seasoning.

Put the tartare on crostini or crackers. This recipe will serve as an appetizer for five or hors devours for 10.