Politics

Global warming: That's a rap!

Young rappers say ‘peace out’ to skeptics

“Glaciers melting, waters rising, sky is storming, global warming!” That’s how a rap written by a group of Vermont teens begins. And they hope it ends with local lawmakers taking action on climate change. The students, who call themselves X-10, first drew attention this spring with their rap, “802,” which described life in Vermont. Their video has been viewed more than 123,000 times on YouTube. Instead of 802, they’re now rapping about CO2 — carbon dioxide, which some scientists blame for global warming. They’re urging lawmakers to override Governor Jim Douglas’ veto of H. 520, a bill that calls for …

RFK Jr. nails it

Amazing how much honesty a non-candidate can bring!

From Brad Blog comes this transcript of Robert F. Kennedy's excellent comments at LiveEarth:

The Sweet Smell of Politics

Rep. John Dingell proposes carbon tax, doesn’t really mean it Rep. John Dingell (D-Mich.), the powerful chair of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, plans to introduce a carbon-tax bill that would raise the cost of burning fossil fuels. Yep, you heard that right: Dingell’s proposal, announced in an interview on C-SPAN, would impose a double-digit tax on each ton of carbon dioxide emitted and raise the federal gasoline tax from 18.4 cents per gallon to 68.4 cents. But hold your applause (or threats) — Dingell’s goal is not to push through a bold climate measure, but to illustrate how …

Interviews and info on the presidential candidates’ environmental positions

Updated 22 Aug 2008   Forget boxers or briefs. You want to know about the presidential candidates’ stances on energy and the environment, right? Well, you’ve come to the right place. Compare the candidates’ green positions using our handy chart. Get a quick rundown on each candidate below, where you’ll also find links to interviews with them, fact sheets on their records, and more. (And at the bottom of the page are links to info on candidates who’ve dropped out of the race.) Descriptions of candidates and their positions are not and should not be perceived as endorsements. Grist does …

Schwarzenegger in dispute with staff who wants to implement global warming legislation

How progressive can legislation be if it’s never allowed to make progress?

Dan Walters writes in the Sacramento Bee: The messy departure of the chairman and executive director of the Air Resources Board, if nothing else, reflects the extremely intense, largely clandestine struggle in the Capitol over how Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's much-ballyhooed anti-global warming crusade is to be implemented. Schwarzenegger says he fired ARB Chairman Robert Sawyer last week because the veteran energy researcher was moving too slowly on cleaning up the San Joaquin Valley's dirty air. But Sawyer and ARB Executive Director Catherine Witherspoon, who resigned Monday, have a far different version, one that rings truer. They contend that Schwarzenegger's chief of staff, Susan Kennedy, and other aides wanted them to slow down on implementing anti-global warming legislation passed last year.

From SUVs to solar panels

Do higher MPG cars mean fewer jobs?

The Chicago Tribune has an article in today's paper entitled "MPG bill could cost UAW jobs; Workers fear SUV plant's fate sealed," although the article itself isn't as shrill as the title suggests. At first glance, the article looks like the classic "those environmentalists are going to take away your jobs" piece, but the author presents data for the other side, that is, that the problems of the auto industry are the problems of the managers of the auto industry: Higher fuel standards would affect all automakers but would hit the domestics harder because they sell a greater percentage of trucks than foreign rivals. Trucks account for 56 percent of GM's sales, two-thirds of Ford's and three-fourths of the Chrysler Group's. Youch! Who's fault is it that they bet the farm on SUVs? The car companies could have analyzed the data on peaking oil, foreign imports of oil, even global warming. Because of their short-term outlook, made much worse by Wall Street's emphasis on the next quarter, not the next quarter of a century, they refused to go down a path that should have been obvious by the end of the 1970s.

Daily Kos founder misfires on 'clean coal'

For shame

Daily Kos founder Markos Moulitsas Zuniga is interviewed in the spring issue of Terrain, the publication of the excellent Ecology Center in Berkeley, Calif. He has some interesting views to share about the green movement, including his disappointment that the top six environmental groups have more cash assets than the "vast right wing conspiracy," yet they keep their pet issues so siloed that they cancel their collective clout, keeping a national green agenda effectively sidelined. But where he loses me is with his tepid but clear endorsement of clean coal: I'm a big supporter of Montana Governor Brian Schweitzer, who is one of the heaviest proponents of clean coal technology and carbon sequestration. Right now we're dependent on the Middle East for a large percentage of our energy needs, and it's clearly making us weaker from a national security perspective. It precipitated the horrid war in Iraq, and it may precipitate another one with Iran. Anything that weans us off that foreign energy and makes us self-dependent I think is a better thing in the short term. He definitely needs some more data.

Kerry: Utilities must act

Letter in the Washington Post

John Kerry had a letter in today's Washington Post:

Brit's Eye View: New prime minister steps up to the plate

A glimpse of environmental policies to come from Gordon Brown

Peter Madden, chief executive of Forum for the Future, writes a monthly column for Gristmill on sustainability in the U.K. and Europe. Britain has a new prime minister. After leading the country for 10 years, Tony Blair has stepped down. Gordon Brown, Blair's number two for the past decade, takes up the reins. Brown is viewed as solid and dependable, if a little dour. He is slightly to the left of Blair on most issues, though he has also pushed through a lot of business-friendly policies. Gordon Brown is notoriously difficult to read; he gives very little of himself away. So what can we expect on the environment from a Brown premiership?